Psychology

Undergraduate Programs

Majors

Program Locations Total Credits
Psychology BS BS - Bachelor of Science
  • Mankato
120

Certificates

Program Locations Total Credits
Experimental Psychology CERT
  • Mankato
21

Minors

Program Locations Total Credits
Psychology Minor
21

Policies & Faculty

Policies

Admission to Major is granted by the department. Department admissions requirements are:

  • a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.7
  • completion of PSYC 101 (Intro to Psych Science) with a grade of “C-” or better.

Contact the department for application procedures.

The department will not accept transfer courses at the 200-level for our major restricted electives, except in a case by case basis.

GPA Policy. Any Psychology course in which a grade of less than “C-” (or P) is earned will not be counted toward a major or minor in psychology.

Teaching Psychology. Students who intend to gain initial licensure to teach psychology in Minnesota schools need to meet the requirements of the social studies BS (teaching) program as described in the Social Studies section of this catalog. 

Contact Information

103 Armstrong Hall

psychology@mnsu.edu

Faculty

100 Level

Credits: 4

This course is designed to provide a thorough introduction to the broad spectrum of theories and applications that make up the field of psychology

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

Credits: 3

Introduces students to major issues in society that impact their lives, behaviors, and the way they think. Course requires student to critically address controversial and non-controversial issues through clear argumentations, intensive writings, research and presentations.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-02

Credits: 2

You have spent years taking tests to measure learning, but do you know how to make the most of your learning in college? In this course we will look at what current learning science research in psychology tells us about how to best learn and remember. A strong emphasis will be made in applying science learning topics to college success.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-02

200 Level

Credits: 4

This course emphasizes understanding the conceptual basis of common statistical procedures and applying those procedures to the problems of organizing information and making inferences from data. Topics include: summarizing data, the logic of inference, estimation, analysis of variance, and correlation.

Prerequisites: Complete one course: MATH 112, MATH 113, MATH 115, MATH 121, MATH 130, or STAT 154

Credits: 1

Exploration of various degrees and types of careers available in psychology, and what psychologists do.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

An overview of the psychological aspects of sexuality including the assessment and treatment of sexual disorders, gender development and identity, sexual orientation, behavioral effects on sexual health, and sexual offending and trauma.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course introduces a multidisciplinary approach to the scientific study of cognition. Contributions from the fields of biology, computer science, neuroscience, philosophy, and psychology are emphasized. Topics include the mind-body problem, perception, memory, linguistics, problem solving, artificial intelligence, and robotics. This course is a prerequisite for the cognitive science major. For the psychology major, it serves as unrestricted elective credit; it does not satisfy the cognitive restricted elective requirement.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

Credits: 4

An introduction to the major components of research methodology in psychology. This is a writing intensive course and involves the processing, interpretation, and exposition of behavioral data.

Prerequisites: Must have a minimum total cumulative GPA of 2.70 or instructor permission to enroll; PSYC 201

Credits: 4

An introduction to the major components of internally valid investigations. Includes use of computers in psychological research.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This class will cover the psychological experiences of diverse individuals in American educational, work, health care, consumer, and legal environments. Diversity in this course will be broadly defined to include race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, age, obesity, pregnancy, disability status, and others as deemed appropriate. Topics of prejudice, discrimination and stigma will be discussed. We will also discuss potential solutions to diversity-related problems in these environments.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-07

Credits: 3

This course is designed to develop an understanding of major variables that impact the psychological development of children. Emphasis will be placed on what parents and other care givers can do to maximize the healthy psychological development of their children.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Understanding oneself and increasing one's satisfaction in living.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

Application of the principles of learning to the instruction of students.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

300 Level

Credits: 3

This course is designed for psychology majors who plan careers in professional psychology (clinical, school, etc.). The purpose of the course is to assist students in developing the skills necessary to compete for graduate school placement. It is advised that students complete this course during their sophomore or junior year.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

This course is designed to introduce students to school psychology. The course will broadly address prominent topics in the field as well as assist students in deciding on graduate school and career objectives.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course will introduce students to the relationship between the structure and function of the nervous system to the underlying biological processes of behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC 201

Credits: 4

Explores the scientific study of human cognition and provides students with broad coverage of the mental processes used to acquire, process, and retain knowledge. Students will examine basic concepts and research findings in topics of human cognition such as perception, attention, memory, reading, and problem solving. Concepts in Cognitive Psychology will be related to everyday behaviors and experiences.

Prerequisites: either Psy 101 OR Psy 206, not both

Credits: 4

An exploration of theories and research related to the ways that the social environment affects people's behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 4

This course examines changes in human behavior over the entire lifespan from conception to death. Topics cover developmental changes in physical, cognitive, and social domains. Traditional theories are integrated with current findings of developmental researchers.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 4

Cultural psychology is an interdisciplinary field that unites psychologists, anthropologists, linguists and philosophers to study how cultural meanings, practices and institutions influence and reflect individual human psychologys. Cultural influences on cognition, perception, emotion, motivation, moral reasoning, and well-being will be discussed with a view towards understanding divergent mentalities by drawing primarily from studies comparing Eastern and Western cultures, as well as some ethnic group companions within the United States. Students should come out of this course with an appreciation for the capacity for humans to create psychological diversity.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 4

An examination of the psychological aspects of human behavior in the work place. Topics include history of Industrial/Organizational psychology, job analysis, performance measurement, predictors of performance, making personnel decisions, training, satisfaction, social perception, motivation, communication, group process, leadership, and organizational culture.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course will introduce you to specific psychological theories and research that have been applied to the United States legal system. Course topics include eyewitness testimony and memory, false confessions, lie detection, gender and ethnicity, and jury processes, among others.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 0

Curricular Practical Training: Co-Operative Experience is a zero-credit full-time practical training experience for one summer and on adjacent fall or spring term. Special rules apply to preserve full-time student status. Please contact an advisor in your program for complete information.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101. At least 60 credits earned; in good standing; instructor permission; co-op contract; other prerequisites may also apply.

400 Level

Credits: 4

Major concepts of human motivation and emotion, presentation of learned cognitive and biological influences on sustained behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W

Credits: 4

Examination of the historical origins of the principal contemporary psychological theories.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course will provide students with knowledge and strategies to describe, identify, and write about Psychological Science. This course will reinforce the science of Psychology through the teaching of successful communication strategies of psychological concepts. Students will complete the course demonstrating how to successfully communicate the discipline to the public.

Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 211W

Credits: 4

How the senses respond to environmental stimuli and how the information they provide is organized into meaningful patterns that make up our experience of the physical world. The effects of maturation and learning in altering those patterns as also considered.

Prerequisites: PSYC 201

Credits: 4

This course provides a broad overview and analysis of the major theories of human and animal learning.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101

Credits: 4

This course covers experimental and behavioral studies of human memory including long-and short-term memory, memory for text, pictures, spatial information, and autobiographical events. Emphasis on real-world situations, including education, in which memory and learning play a role.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W

Credits: 1-4

This course provides students with an overview of the fundamental principles and current research on selected topics in cognitive psychology through critical evaluation, discussion, and application. May be re-taken for credit. Specific course topics will be determined by the instructor.

Prerequisites: PSYC 325, PSYC 414, PSYC 415 (ONE course from that list, not all 3)

Credits: 4

An overview of development, use, and validation of psychological tests. Topics include reliability and validity, test construction, item analysis, ethics, test administration and scoring, and computerized testing.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W 

Credits: 4

Biological foundations of the actions of psychoactive drugs. Neuroanatomy structure and function, neurophysiology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics will be covered in detail. Relevant classes of drugs will be highlighted with an eye toward their history, mechanisms of action, effects, and treatments.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W 

Credits: 4

Biological basis of psychological processes and behavior. Neuroanatomy, neural function, and laboratory methods of investigation will be explored in relation to topics such as sleep, memory, language, intelligence and psychological disorders.

Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 211W

Credits: 4

The goal of neuroscience is to understand the human mind. This goal is approached by revealing the brain processes involved in how we perceive, think, remember, and move. Brain development, communication, and plasticity at the neural level are all described.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W, PSYC321

Credits: 4

This writing intensive course provides an overview of the application of genetics methods to the study of behavior. We will examine the basic concepts in genetics with an emphasis on behavioral phenotypes, evolution and evolutionary psychology and the genetics of the individual differences.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the application of genetic methods to the study of behavior. This course examines the basic concepts in genetics with an emphasis on behavioral phenotypes, evolution and evolutionary psychology and the genetics of individual differences.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course provides students with an overview of the fundamental principles and current research on selected topics in biological psychology through critical evaluation and discussion.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W, PSYC 321

Credits: 4

The course is an extension of Psyc 421 and includes an advanced examination of topics including: brain organization, neuronal signaling, and specific topics in the field of biological psychology.

Prerequisites: PSYC 420, PSYC 421, PSYC 425W (ONE course from that list, not all 3)

Credits: 1-4

This course provides students with an overview of the fundamental principles and current research on selected topics in developmental psychology through critical evaluation, discussion, and application. May be re-taken for credit. Specific course topics will be determined by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Psyc 433, Psyc 436, Psyc 343, Psyc 466: One course from this list, not all 4

Credits: 4

Physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and personality development from conception to preadolescence. Focus on interplay between maturation and experience.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 4

his course is designed to provide a survey of psychopathology in children. It introduces selected topics and issues relating to the emotional, social, cognitive, and behavioral health of children. The course will address problems in infants to adolescents in the home, school, and community. Topics will include models of ¿normal¿ and abnormal development, environmental and dispositional factors relating to behavior, psychopathology, etiology, assessment, and diagnosis of major childhood emotional and behavioral disorders. Discussion of treatment of behavior disorders will be included.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 4

This class covers the development of the individual from the age of 11 to 19 years of age. Discussion will include aspects of both normal and abnormal development.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Exploring factors affecting leadership and effective group processes through lectures and discussion of theories and findings and through experiential activities.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 4

An in-depth examination of social psychological research in laboratory and field settings.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W, PSYC 340 or PSYC 358 

Credits: 1-4

This course provides students with an overview of the fundamental principles and current research on selected topics in social psychology through critical evaluation, discussion, and application. May be re-taken for credit. Specific course topics will be determined by the instructor.

Prerequisites: PSYC 340, PSYC 358, PSYC 455, PSYC 460W (ONE course from list, not all 4)

Credits: 4

Advanced Cognitive Psychology introduces students to key research papers in the field of human cognition. Through reading, writing, and the study of experimental design, students will advance their understanding of cognitive psychology and develop their ability to critically review and evaluate research.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W, PSYC 325

Credits: 4

This course is designed to increase the student's awareness and understanding of abnormal psychology. Students will become familiar with clinical descriptions, course of onset, and treatment regimens specific to various disorders.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101

Credits: 3

A critical examination of current psychological approaches to the study of women's behavior and experience. The course will emphasize empirical ways of knowing and address psychological questions of central concern to women. Development of gender differences also will be explored.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 3

Analysis of product marketing and consumer purchasing strategies and their determinants. Prereq: 8 PSYC credits

Prerequisites: 8 PSYC credits 

Credits: 4

Aging process and development during the adult years; psychology and psychological concerns of the aging individual; dealing with death.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the procedures and processes of behavior change in applied contexts. Topics include functional assessment, behavioral intervention planning, and specific applied behavioral analytic interventions with an emphasis on non-aversive options.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W 

Credits: 4

The interface of behavioral and medical science is explored. Research on environmental and learning factors in the etiology and treatment of physical disease and rehabilitation is examined. Specific topics include pain management, medical compliance, behavior disorders in nursing homes and on chronic illnesses. Prereq: Three courses in PSYC

Prerequisites: Three courses in PSYC 

Credits: 1-4

Application of psychology to topics of current interest. May be retaken for credit.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 1-5

Application of psychology to topics of current interest. May be retaken for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-3

Topics to be announced. May be retaken for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Individualized research experience with a faculty mentor in the psychology department. You will gain specific research experience as designed by a faculty mentor. To register for this course, you must first apply and be accepted to join a psychology faculty members' research team.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-8

A learning experience integrated with the student's course of study, to be developed with an advisor and the field experience coordinator. May be retaken for credit up to an 8 credit total for all enrollments. Available for P/N grading only. Prereq: 9 credits of PSYC

Prerequisites: 9 credits of PSYC 

Credits: 1-4

Individualized learning under faculty supervision.

Prerequisites: none