Cognitive Science

Undergraduate Programs

Majors

Program Locations Total Credits
Cognitive Science BS Biology BS - Bachelor of Science
  • Mankato
120
Cognitive Science BS Computer Science BS - Bachelor of Science
  • Mankato
120
Cognitive Science BS Philosophy BS - Bachelor of Science
  • Mankato
120
Cognitive Science BS Psychology BS - Bachelor of Science
  • Mankato
120

Policies & Faculty

Policies

Admission to the major is granted by the Cognitive Science Program. Minimum admission requirements are:

  • a minimum of 32 earned semester hours.
  • a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5

Contact the Cognitive Science Program Director or the Program Advisors in one of the four participating departments. 

Grading Policy. All coursework applied towards the major must be taken for a letter grade except for courses offered only as P/N. A minimum grade of “C-” is required in all courses which are to be applied towards the major. In addition, a minimum grade of “C-” is required for all prerequisite courses where dictated by individual department polices. Grades of “D” are not accepted by the program for Prerequisites to the major, major common core and major restricted elective courses. 

Contact Information

226 Armstrong Hall

(507) 389-2012
http://cset.mnsu.edu/cogsci/

Faculty

100 Level

Credits: 3

Introduction to the nature of philosophy and specific, basic problems.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06

Credits: 4

Introductory course designed for students not majoring in science. Focuses on basic biological principles with special emphasis on the human species. Includes scientific problem solving, biodiversity, human and social aspects of biology, ecology, cellular processes and organ function, human reproduction, pre-natal development, and heredity. Lecture, laboratory, and small group discussions.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03, GE-08

Credits: 4

This course is designed to provide a thorough introduction to the broad spectrum of theories and applications that make up the field of psychology

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

Credits: 3

This course considers historical and contemporary analyses of the mind in relation to the body and the connection of the mind-body problem to other issues concerning both religion and science.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06

Credits: 2-4

Students focus on specific biological perspectives, including environmental science, biology of women, biotechnology, human heredity, etc. May be repeated for credit under different sub-titles.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

An introduction to biological topics of special interest to women with emphasis on anatomic and physiologic changes over the course of a woman's lifetime. Designed for students not majoring in science. Presents fundamental biologic concepts within this specialized context and provides opportunity to collect, evaluate, and analyze data.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

Introduces students to major issues in society that impact their lives, behaviors, and the way they think. Course requires student to critically address controversial and non-controversial issues through clear argumentations, intensive writings, research and presentations.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-02

Credits: 3

An introductory course designed for students not majoring in science. Focuses on basic biological principles as applied to biotechnology. Includes basic natural science principles, scientific problem solving, and human and social aspects of biotechnology. Lecture, laboratory, and small group discussions.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

This course provides fundamental conceptual, mathematical, and logical tools for students wishing to major in Computer Science. Topics include hardware concepts, number systems, computer arithmetic, counting, sets and functions, logic, simple induction, etc. Coreq: Math 112

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Study of biological processes at the suborganismal level including cell chemistry, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, and complex tissue physiology. Laboratory and discussion sessions stress problem solving and experimental design.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 4

Study of biological processes at the suborganismal level including cell chemistry, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, and complex tissue physiology. Laboratory and discussion sessions stress problem solving and experimental design.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 4

Study of biological processes at the organismal level including a survey of life forms (viruses, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals), their evolution, and ecology. Laboratory and discussion sessions stress problem solving and experimental design.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 

Credits: 3

Traditional syllogistic logic and an introduction to the elements of modern symbolic logic.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-04

Credits: 4

Students will learn programming skills in object-oriented C++. Students will design algorithms and learn how to write, compile, run and debug programs that include selection and repetition structures, functions, and arrays. Study skills and professional development will be addressed.Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: MATH 112 (College Algebra)

Credits: 4

Continues the exploration of introductory Computer Science begun in CS 110. Focus is on developing basic knowledge of algorithms, programming skills and problem solving techniques. Topics include recursion, sorting, linked lists, stacks and queues.Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: CS 110 or EE 107. MATH 113 or MATH 115 or MATH 121

Credits: 3

This course explores what makes reasoning scientific as distinguished from non-scientific. Issues are inductive reasoning, causal reasoning, fallacies, hypothetico-deductive reasoning, falsifiability, and scientific knowledge.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-04

Credits: 3

To what extent do the differences among races and between genders represent biological differences, and to what extent are they constructed by society? Is racism best conceptualized as an additional burden to sexism or as one different in kind?

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-07

Credits: 3

Discussion of theories of value and obligation.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Credits: 3

Survey of Asian philosophical traditions of Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-08

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 2

You have spent years taking tests to measure learning, but do you know how to make the most of your learning in college? In this course we will look at what current learning science research in psychology tells us about how to best learn and remember. A strong emphasis will be made in applying science learning topics to college success.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-02

Credits: 2

This course provides an introduction to programming using C++. Emphasis on structured programming concepts, with a brief discussion of object-oriented programming. Control structures, expressions, input/ output, arrays, and functions. F, S

Prerequisites: MATH 113 or MATH 115

Credits: 1

An introduction to the health care profession with special emphasis on clinical laboratory personnel. Course includes presentations by professionals in some of the major health care fields, especially medical technology. Includes lectures, field observations.

Prerequisites: none

200 Level

Credits: 4

Course will explore the interplay between science fiction (1950s-present) and the development of artificial intelligence. Turing tests, agents, senses, problem solving, game playing, information retrieval, machine translation robotics, and ethical issues. Variable

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Credits: 4

This course emphasizes understanding the conceptual basis of common statistical procedures and applying those procedures to the problems of organizing information and making inferences from data. Topics include: summarizing data, the logic of inference, estimation, analysis of variance, and correlation.

Prerequisites: Complete one course: MATH 112, MATH 113, MATH 115, MATH 121, MATH 130, or STAT 154

Credits: 1

Exploration of various degrees and types of careers available in psychology, and what psychologists do.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Discussion of the ways that a culture both creates human community and shapes self-identity. Exploration of similarities and differences between and interdependence among cultural traditions, and of vocabularies for assessing traditions.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-08

Credits: 4

An overview of the psychological aspects of sexuality including the assessment and treatment of sexual disorders, gender development and identity, sexual orientation, behavioral effects on sexual health, and sexual offending and trauma.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course introduces a multidisciplinary approach to the scientific study of cognition. Contributions from the fields of biology, computer science, neuroscience, philosophy, and psychology are emphasized. Topics include the mind-body problem, perception, memory, linguistics, problem solving, artificial intelligence, and robotics. This course is a prerequisite for the cognitive science major. For the psychology major, it serves as unrestricted elective credit; it does not satisfy the cognitive restricted elective requirement.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

Credits: 2

C++ syntax for students who already know Java. Specific topics are: data types, operators, functions, arrays, string operations, pointers, structures, classes, constructors, destructors, pointers as class members, static classes, the this pointer, operator functions, data type conversions, inheritance, polymorphism, and dynamic binding.VariablePrereq: Consent

Prerequisites: Consent 

Credits: 4

Investigates efficient data structuring techniques to support a variety of operations in different problem scenarios. Topics include binary trees, binary search trees, multiway search trees, hashing and hash tables, priority queues, and algorithm analysis for best, worst and average cases.Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: CS 111 and MATH 121

Credits: 4

An introduction to the major components of research methodology in psychology. This is a writing intensive course and involves the processing, interpretation, and exposition of behavioral data.

Prerequisites: Must have a minimum total cumulative GPA of 2.70 or instructor permission to enroll; PSYC 201

Credits: 4

An introduction to the major components of internally valid investigations. Includes use of computers in psychological research.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Introduction to genetic analysis. Topics covered will include those of both classical and modern genetics: population genetics, molecular genetics, genetic manipulation of organisms and selection. Central to this course will be the primacy of the trait as the object of genetics and the development/refinement of the concept of the gene. Lab included.Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and MATH 112 

Credits: 4

Principles of the study of relationships between organisms and the environment. Topics include flow of energy and materials, organism-level interactions, growth and evolution of populations, and community ecology. Field trips to prairie, lake, stream, and forest communities, training in data collection and analysis, use of equipment, and report writing. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 or consent 

Credits: 4

Biology of plants including unique features of plant cells, life histories, metabolism, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. The course empathizes plants' remarkable adaptations to their environments, their diversity, and the vital roles they play in ecological interactions. For biology and environmental science majors and minors. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 or consent 

Credits: 4

This class will cover the psychological experiences of diverse individuals in American educational, work, health care, consumer, and legal environments. Diversity in this course will be broadly defined to include race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, age, obesity, pregnancy, disability status, and others as deemed appropriate. Topics of prejudice, discrimination and stigma will be discussed. We will also discuss potential solutions to diversity-related problems in these environments.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-07

Credits: 3

This course introduces students to assembly language programming and basic machine structures. Topics include number systems; basis central processing unit (CPU) organization, instruction formats, addressing modes and their use with a variety of data structures; and parameter passing techniques. Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: CS 110 and EE 106

Credits: 4

Systems approach to the structure of the human body. The course is designed for students majoring in biology or health related programs. Lab included.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

This laboratory course complements CS 220, offering students hands-on programming experience to reinforce assembly language programming concepts. Topics include number systems; instruction formats, addressing modes and their use; and parameter passing techniques including the use of the stack frame. Coreq: CS 220 Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Ethical perspectives relevant to issues such as euthanasia, genetic engineering, organ transplant, patients' rights, abortion, etc.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Credits: 3

Introduction to ethical theories and concepts and their application to specific cases in the world of business.V

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Credits: 3

Introduction to ethical theories and concepts and their application to specific cases in the world of business.V

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Credits: 3

Questions about human responsibilities to other animals and the environment gain urgency as environmental crises become more prevalent, and animal species continue to be eliminated. Learn about, critique, and apply the principles underlying evaluations of human environmental conduct.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-09, GE-10

Credits: 4

Fundamentals of data mining and knowledge discovery. Methods include decision tree algorithms, association rule generators, neural networks, and web-based mining. Rule-based systems and intelligent agents are introduced. Students learn how to apply data-mining tools to real-world problems.

Prerequisites: CS 110

Credits: 3

This course is designed to develop an understanding of major variables that impact the psychological development of children. Emphasis will be placed on what parents and other care givers can do to maximize the healthy psychological development of their children.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Consideration of the basic philosophical approaches to the idea of justice and how this idea relates to other fundamental ideas in political philosophy, ethics, and law.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Credits: 3

Understanding oneself and increasing one's satisfaction in living.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

An introduction to the general principles and methods used in the study of microorganisms. Lab included. Prereq: One BIOL course and one semester of chemistry from among CHEM 104, CHEM 106, CHEM 111, or CHEM 201. Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: One BIOL course and one semester of chemistry from among CHEM 104, CHEM 106, CHEM 111, or CHEM 201 

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

An introduction to graphical programming environments. Topics include data and data types, repetition, selection, data acquisition, data dependency, efficiency, modular program construction, array processing, debugging, and visualization.

Prerequisites: EET 113, MATH 121

Credits: 3

Provides experience with a wide variety of biological laboratory exercises to prepare prospective elementary teachers. Emphasis is on building knowledge, skills, and confidence. The course will cover major biological concepts and environmental education through classroom-ready examples selected to illustrate each concept.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

This class provides MAX scholars with an opportunity to explore a set of topics related to achieving success in academic, professional and personal realms. Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers and industry members as well as student participants. NOTE: Credit does not apply to any major.Fall, SpringPrereq: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent

Prerequisites: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent.

Credits: 1-4

Application of the principles of learning to the instruction of students.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 1

This class provides MAX scholars with an opportunity to explore a set of topics related to achieving success in academic, professional and personal realms. Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers and industry members as well as student participants.Fall, SpringRereq: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent

Prerequisites: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent

Credits: 1-3

Workshop topics will be announced. Workshops on different topics may be taken for credit.

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor

Credits: 1

Provides students interested in a computer science major or minor an opportunity to explore topics not normally covered in the curriculum. Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, undergraduate students admitted to the Computer Science major, visiting researchers and industry members.Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-2

Special topics not covered in other 100 or 200-level courses. May be repeated for each new topic.Variable

Prerequisites: none

300 Level

Credits: 4

A team-based capstone experience for the mid-point of the CS program. Students are introduced to principles and methodologies of large-scale software development and engineering by working on a full life-cycle software project solving a substantial problem using multiple CS concepts.Spring

Prerequisites: CS 210 and CS 220

Credits: 2

This course introduces the foundational concepts of operating systems including operating systems principles, concurrency, scheduling, dispatch, and memory management and prepares students for advanced topics in operating systems.

Prerequisites: CIS 223, CIS 224 or EE 234, and admission to major.

Credits: 2

Evolution is a unifying theory of biology. Students are provided the history of evolutionary thought and the Darwinian revolution, evidence for evolution, mechanics of evolution, and an array of special topics such as speciation, molecular evolution, conservation, and extinction. Readings will include book chapters and journal articles. Lecture/discussion.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 211

Credits: 2

This course introduces the foundational concepts of software engineering, and parallel and distributed computing and prepares students for advanced topics in these areas.

Prerequisites: CIS 223, CIS 224, and admission to major.

Credits: 2

This course introduces the foundational concepts of programming languages, including the principles of language design, language constructs, and comparison of major languages. Topics include formal methods of examining syntax and semantics of languages and lexical analysis of language components and constructs, and propositional and predicate calculi.

Prerequisites: CIS 223, CIS 224, and admission to major.

Credits: 3

This course is designed for psychology majors who plan careers in professional psychology (clinical, school, etc.). The purpose of the course is to assist students in developing the skills necessary to compete for graduate school placement. It is advised that students complete this course during their sophomore or junior year.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

This course introduces the foundational concepts of Information Management, Database Systems, Data Modeling, Data Security, Secure Design, Defensive Programming, Security and Cryptography.

Prerequisites: CIS 223, CIS 224, and admission to major.

Credits: 2

This course is designed to introduce students to school psychology. The course will broadly address prominent topics in the field as well as assist students in deciding on graduate school and career objectives.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Study of the core algorithm design and analysis techniques of computer science and the data structures which support them with attention to the applicability to specific problem types and comparison metrics.

Prerequisites: CS 111, MATH 121

Credits: 2

An introduction to data communications and networks. The field encompasses local area networks, wide area networks, and wireless communication. Topics include digital signals, transmission techniques, error detection and correction, OSI model, TCP/IP model, network topologies, network protocols, and communications hardware.

Prerequisites: CIS 223 and CIS 224 or EE 234

Credits: 3

Algorithm design and analysis is central to much of computer science. This course exposes students to fundamental algorithm design and analysis techniques. Topics include many of the basic topic areas of computer science: searching, sorting, numeric computation, data representation, communication.Fall

Prerequisites: CS 210

Credits: 4

Principles of functions of human cells, organs, and systems with an emphasis on organ/system interactions. Designed for majors that do not require a strong medical and research emphasis. Includes an active learning laboratory to facilitate learning the complex lecture material.

Prerequisites: BIOL 220, CHEM 104 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or CHEM 201

Credits: 3

Study of the elements of first order symbolic logic, i.e., the propositional calculus and the predicate calculus, and its applications to ordinary language and mathematics.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-04

Credits: 4

An introduction to methods, algorithms, and tools of cryptography. We will study the algorithmic and mathematical aspects of cryptographic methods and protocols. We will experiment with how they can be used to solve particular data and communication security problems. Prerequisite: CS 305 or permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: CS 305 or permission of instructor.

Credits: 3

A comprehensive phylogenetic survey of both invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Emphasis on evolutionary relationships among phyla, the evolution of organ systems, animal organization and function, animal adaptations, and zoogeographical considerations. Research and inquiry of animal unity and diversity will include using the Internet. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 

Credits: 3

This course presents historical and current concepts and implementations of computer organization. Topics include instruction set design, digital storage, performance metrics, processor datapath and control, pipelining, memory hierarchy, busses and I/O interfacing, and parallel processors.Spring

Prerequisites: CS 111 and CS 220, or EE 334

Credits: 4

An examination of eukaryotic cellular structure, organization and physiology. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106, BIOL 211 

Credits: 3

Human rights and responsibilities in relation to the organization of society and government.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Credits: 4

This course will introduce students to the relationship between the structure and function of the nervous system to the underlying biological processes of behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC 201

Credits: 3

Topics in normative, meta-ethical and applied ethical theory.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to important texts in moral and social philosophy that provide the foundation for modern economics. In addition, we will discuss philosophical accounts of rationality, well being, and freedom and their relevance to economic analysis.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-09

Credits: 3

Basic anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. The course is designed for students majoring in biology, psychology or health related programs.

Prerequisites: BIOL 220 

Credits: 4

Explores the scientific study of human cognition and provides students with broad coverage of the mental processes used to acquire, process, and retain knowledge. Students will examine basic concepts and research findings in topics of human cognition such as perception, attention, memory, reading, and problem solving. Concepts in Cognitive Psychology will be related to everyday behaviors and experiences.

Prerequisites: either Psy 101 OR Psy 206, not both

Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of neural computation. The goal is to familiarize students with the major models, techniques, and problems of neural network computation and to provide hands-on experience using these things. Topics include neural network models, supervised and unsupervised learning, associative memory models, and data representation.

Prerequisites: CS 230

Credits: 4

Principles of functions of human cells, organs, and systems with an emphasis on organ/system interactions. This course is designed for students majoring in biology, chemistry, or related sciences, and medically-related areas. Includes a laboratory with a research and medical emphasis.

Prerequisites: BIOL 220, CHEM 104 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or CHEM 201

Credits: 3

Philosophers of Ancient Greece, Rome and the early middle ages: The presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, Hellenistic and Roman philosophers, St. Augustine.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06

Credits: 3

Late Medieval Philosophy and its influence on the Renaissance, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz and Continental Rationalism, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and British Empiricism, and Kant.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06

Credits: 3

Philosophers and philosophies of the 19th century.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06

Credits: 3

Colonial times to the present.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

An exploration of theories and research related to the ways that the social environment affects people's behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 3

This course covers the fundamentals of database management focusing on the relational data model. Topics include database organization, file organization, query processing, concurrency control, recovery, data integrity, optimization and view implementation. Fall

Prerequisites: CS 210 and CS 320

Credits: 4

This course examines changes in human behavior over the entire lifespan from conception to death. Topics cover developmental changes in physical, cognitive, and social domains. Traditional theories are integrated with current findings of developmental researchers.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 3

An introduction to data communications and networks. The field encompasses local area networks, wide area networks, and wireless communication. Topics include digital signals, transmission techniques, error detection and correction, OSI model, TCP/IP model, network topologies, network protocols, and communications hardware.Spring

Prerequisites: CS 305 or EE 234

Credits: 1

A laboratory in conjunction with CS 350.

Prerequisites: CS 305 or EE 234. Permission of instructor

Credits: 3

Critical discussion of the topics chosen from the Asian philosophical traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-06, GE-08

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 4

Cultural psychology is an interdisciplinary field that unites psychologists, anthropologists, linguists and philosophers to study how cultural meanings, practices and institutions influence and reflect individual human psychologys. Cultural influences on cognition, perception, emotion, motivation, moral reasoning, and well-being will be discussed with a view towards understanding divergent mentalities by drawing primarily from studies comparing Eastern and Western cultures, as well as some ethnic group companions within the United States. Students should come out of this course with an appreciation for the capacity for humans to create psychological diversity.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 3

This course focuses on machine level I/O and operating system file processing. Structure of systems programs including assemblers, linkers, and object-oriented utilities and interfaces. Students will gain experience in writing utility programs and extensions to operating systems.Fall

Prerequisites: CS 111 or EE 107, and CS 320

Credits: 3

Structure and logic of religious belief. Problems such as the existence of God, evil, immortality, miracles, and religious language.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course introduces the student to Windows programming in C++ using the Application Programming Interface. Windows programs are created in a visual development environment which includes editing and code generating facilities. Hands-on programming skills are developed in the lab.Variable

Prerequisites: CS 210

Credits: 4

An examination of the psychological aspects of human behavior in the work place. Topics include history of Industrial/Organizational psychology, job analysis, performance measurement, predictors of performance, making personnel decisions, training, satisfaction, social perception, motivation, communication, group process, leadership, and organizational culture.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

The course introduces the student to graphics and game programming. Graphics programming topics addressed include modeling, rendering, and animation of vector-based components and bitmaps. Programs are created using a current graphics and game development environment.

Prerequisites: CS 210, CS 220, MATH 121

Credits: 3

Fundamental concepts of programming languages, including the principles of language design, language constructs, and comparison of major languages. Topics: formal methods of examining syntax and semantics of languages and lexical analysis of language components and constructs, and propositional and predicate calculi.Fall

Prerequisites: CS 210

Credits: 3

Students are introduced to techniques used in the analysis and design of software systems. Traditional techniques are reviewed and current methodologies for both object-oriented and procedural systems are studied. Standard notations used to document software requirements and designs are presented.Spring

Prerequisites: CS 300

Credits: 3

Basic understanding of the principles of immunohematology applied to the area of blood blanking including major blood group systems, principles for antigen/antibody detection and identification, donor blood collection, transfusion evaluation, theory of renal function in health and disease, specimen collection, handling, and processing, and components of routine urinalysis.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course will introduce you to specific psychological theories and research that have been applied to the United States legal system. Course topics include eyewitness testimony and memory, false confessions, lie detection, gender and ethnicity, and jury processes, among others.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Students learn and practice the essential elements of computer science through research, classical problem or industry project implementation: scoping, modeling, experimentation, analysis, modern tools, creativity, business plans, and global/societal/environmental impacts. Students learn and develop the elements of professionalism while operating in project teams. Topics include leadership, metacognition, teamwork, written and oral communication, ethics and professional and personal responsibility. Course must be taken concurrently with CS 495.

Prerequisites: CIS 223 and MATH 280

Credits: 4

Students learn and practice the essential elements of computer science through research, classical problem or industry project implementation: scoping, modeling, experimentation, analysis, modern tools, creativity, business plans, and global/societal/environmental impacts. Students learn and develop the elements of professionalism while operating in project teams. Topics include leadership, metacognition, teamwork, written and oral communication, ethics and professional and personal responsibility. Course must be taken concurrently with CS 495.

Prerequisites: CIS 223 and MATH 280

Credits: 4

Students further learn and practice the essential elements of computer science through research, classical problem or industry project implementation: scoping, modeling, experimentation, analysis, modern tools, creativity, business plans, and global/societal/environmental impacts. Students continue to learn and develop the elements of professionalism while operating in project teams. Topics include leadership, metacognition, teamwork, written and oral communication, ethics and professional and personal responsibility. Course must be taken concurrently with CS 495.

Prerequisites: CS 391W

Credits: 4

Students further learn and practice the essential elements of computer science through research, classical problem or industry project implementation: scoping, modeling, experimentation, analysis, modern tools, creativity, business plans, and global/societal/environmental impacts. Students continue to learn and develop the elements of professionalism while operating in project teams. Topics include leadership, metacognition, teamwork, written and oral communication, ethics and professional and personal responsibility. Course must be taken concurrently with CS 495.

Prerequisites: CS 391

Credits: 0

Curricular Practical Training: Co-Operative Experience is a zero-credit full-time practical training experience for one summer and on adjacent fall or spring term. Special rules apply to preserve full-time student status. Please contact an advisor in your program for complete information.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101. At least 60 credits earned; in good standing; instructor permission; co-op contract; other prerequisites may also apply.

Credits: 1

This course is designed to provide hands-on research experience to RISEbio scholars. Students taking this course will be involved in an original research project. Using a variety of methods, students will collect original data and contribute to problem solving in the biological sciences. As an early research experience, emphasis will be placed on the process of scientific research, including formulation of a research plan, data collection, assessment of data quality and interpretation based on available data. Students are required to keep a lab notebook and present their findings to classmates and a wider audience.

Prerequisites: none

400 Level

Credits: 3

This course will undertake a close reading and study of Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason and other texts.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Current processes, methods, and tools related to formal methods for modeling and designing software systems. Topics include software architectures, methodologies, model representations, component-based design, patterns, frameworks, CASE-based designs, and case studies.Variable

Prerequisites: CS 300 and MATH 121

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to operating systems such as security and protection, virtual machines, device management, file systems, real time and embedded systems, fault tolerance and system performance evaluation. Prerequisite: Admission to Major or Permission

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

The structure and function of stream ecosystems are presented with emphasis on adaptations of organisms to stream life and connections between stream organisms, the aquatic environment, and the surrounding watershed. Includes lab, field work, and team projects. Prereq: BIOL 105W, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consentSummer

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to programming languages such as syntax analysis, semantic analysis, code generation, runtime systems, static analysis, advanced programming constructs, concurrency and parallelism, type systems, formal semantics, language pragmatics, and logic programming. Prerequisite: Admission to Major or Permission

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Applications of principles from ecology, genetics, behavior, demography, economics, philosophy, and other fields to the conservation and sustainable use of natural populations of plants and animals. Lectures and discussions address topics such as habitat fragmentation, parks and reserves, genetic diversity, population viability, and extinction.

Prerequisites: BIOL 215 or consent 

Credits: 4

To provide students the values and functions of wetlands and to use wetlands as an example of the relationship of ecology to management, and the impact that classification systems have politically. Lab (fieldwork) included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215, or consent 

Credits: 3

A study of the philosophy of Ludwig Wittgenstein.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Major concepts of human motivation and emotion, presentation of learned cognitive and biological influences on sustained behavior.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W

Credits: 3

An introduction to fish biology and fisheries management, diversity, form, and function in the aquatic environment, functional physiology, evolution and speciation, identification and use of keys, ecology, and management topics.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215, or consent of instructor

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to networking and computation such as mobility and social networking and expansion of topics covered in CS 306. Prerequisite: Admission to Major or Permission

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

A field course in the ecology of birds, mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and fishes. Students are trained in sampling techniques such as mark-and-recapture, population size estimation and monitoring, and species identification of live and preserved specimens. Lectures encompass evolution and adoption, origins, energetics, mating systems, morphology, geographical distributions, and population-level phenomena. Lecture and Laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent 

Credits: 4

Examination of the historical origins of the principal contemporary psychological theories.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

A field course focused on the function and dynamics of various North American ecosystems. Emphases will be on natural history, critical thought, and experimental design. Students will be trained in a variety of soil, plant, and animal sampling techniques. Depending on enrollment, there may be additional costs (e.g., camping fees) for the course.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent 

Credits: 3

Theories of meaning, speech acts and semantics, relation of language to the world.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to algorithms and computing such as advanced computational complexity, automata theory and computability, and advanced data structures algorithms and analysis. This includes the theoretical underpinnings of modern computer science, focusing on three main models of computation: DFA, PDA and Turing Machines. Students determine model capabilities and limitations: what is and is not computable by each of them.

Prerequisites: Admission to major or permission.

Credits: 4

This course will provide students with knowledge and strategies to describe, identify, and write about Psychological Science. This course will reinforce the science of Psychology through the teaching of successful communication strategies of psychological concepts. Students will complete the course demonstrating how to successfully communicate the discipline to the public.

Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 211W

Credits: 3

This class examines the effects of natural and human-induced changes in climate on terrestrial and marine ecosystems. The course focuses on the science behind global change issues that have biological, social, and economic implicatons.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent 

Credits: 3

This course will examine multiple facets of human genetics. The modern human genome is not a static entity but one that arose from a dynamic combination of inputs from multiple human species, effects from the environment, and their mixture over time. The first third of the course will study ancient human genetics and their contributions to our genome, the second will study human ancestry and migration patterns, and human population genetics. The final third of the course will investigate the modern human genome, genetic diseases, genetic engineering of our genome, and the future of human genetics and its ethical implications.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Soil ecology will focus on the genesis and classification of soils, the physical properties of soil as they relate to habitat formation, niches, interactions that exist among soil organisms, human impact on soil systems relative to population pressures and management practices. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215, or consent 

Credits: 4

How the senses respond to environmental stimuli and how the information they provide is organized into meaningful patterns that make up our experience of the physical world. The effects of maturation and learning in altering those patterns as also considered.

Prerequisites: PSYC 201

Credits: 4

This course provides a broad overview and analysis of the major theories of human and animal learning.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101

Credits: 4

This course covers experimental and behavioral studies of human memory including long-and short-term memory, memory for text, pictures, spatial information, and autobiographical events. Emphasis on real-world situations, including education, in which memory and learning play a role.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to parallel and distributed computing such as parallel algorithms, architecture, and performance, distributed systems, cloud computing, and formal models and semantics. These have been called techniques for High Performance Computing. Topics also include application areas and basic concepts of parallel computing, hardware design of modern HPC platforms and parallel programming models, methods of measuring and characterizing serial and parallel performance.

Prerequisites: Admission to major or permission.

Credits: 1-4

This course provides students with an overview of the fundamental principles and current research on selected topics in cognitive psychology through critical evaluation, discussion, and application. May be re-taken for credit. Specific course topics will be determined by the instructor.

Prerequisites: PSYC 325, PSYC 414, PSYC 415 (ONE course from that list, not all 3)

Credits: 3

Emphasis is placed on the biomedical aspects of aging and chronic disease. The course is designed for students majoring in biology, gerontology programs, or other health related programs.

Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or BIOL 105 

Credits: 4

An overview of development, use, and validation of psychological tests. Topics include reliability and validity, test construction, item analysis, ethics, test administration and scoring, and computerized testing.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W 

Credits: 4

Biological foundations of the actions of psychoactive drugs. Neuroanatomy structure and function, neurophysiology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics will be covered in detail. Relevant classes of drugs will be highlighted with an eye toward their history, mechanisms of action, effects, and treatments.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W 

Credits: 3

Theories of knowledge and justification, skeptical attacks on the possibility of knowledge, and anti-skeptical defenses.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to computer architecture and organization such as functional organization, multiprocessing and alternative architectures, and performance enhancements. This includes topics in computer architecture including a major emphasis on measuring and improving computer performance. Topics include advances in pipelining and analysis and optimization of storage systems and networks, multiprocessor challenges and trends.

Prerequisites: Admission to major or permission.

Credits: 4

Clinically important parasites. Protozoans, Flukes, Tapeworms, Roundworms, Ticks, Mites and Insects. Designed for Medical Technology, Pre-Med, Pre-Vet and Biology majors. Identification, clinical disease, epidemiology and ecology are covered. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or BIOL 105, BIOL 106 recommended 

Credits: 3

Morphological, physiological, medical, and economic significance of insects.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 or consent 

Credits: 4

Biological basis of psychological processes and behavior. Neuroanatomy, neural function, and laboratory methods of investigation will be explored in relation to topics such as sleep, memory, language, intelligence and psychological disorders.

Prerequisites: PSYC 201, PSYC 211W

Credits: 4

The goal of neuroscience is to understand the human mind. This goal is approached by revealing the brain processes involved in how we perceive, think, remember, and move. Brain development, communication, and plasticity at the neural level are all described.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W, PSYC321

Credits: 3

Understanding the process of cell differentiation and development. Special emphasis will be placed on the genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms that direct the development of multicellular organisms. Course to include current areas of research and other timely topics.

Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or BIOL 105 

Credits: 4

This writing intensive course provides an overview of the application of genetics methods to the study of behavior. We will examine the basic concepts in genetics with an emphasis on behavioral phenotypes, evolution and evolutionary psychology and the genetics of the individual differences.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W

Credits: 3

This course provides an overview of embedded and real-time systems including design principles, methodologies, design tools and problem solving techniques. Students design and build a real-time operation system with a microprocessor to host real-time service data processing using sensor/actuator devices.Variable

Prerequisites: CS 210 and CS 320

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the application of genetic methods to the study of behavior. This course examines the basic concepts in genetics with an emphasis on behavioral phenotypes, evolution and evolutionary psychology and the genetics of individual differences.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

Biology 425 is an optional 1-credit laboratory addition to Developmental Biology, Biology 424. In the laboratory component, students will be exposed to modern techniques used to examine developmental processes in several key model systems. Laboratory exercises consist of experiments designed to demonstrate fundamental concepts in development and to familiarize students with experimental approaches utilized in studying developmental biology and embryology.

Prerequisites: BIOL 211; Co-requisite: BIOL 424

Credits: 4

This course provides students with an overview of the fundamental principles and current research on selected topics in biological psychology through critical evaluation and discussion.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W, PSYC 321

Credits: 3

An investigation of the most fundamental concepts of reality, including the nature of things, identity over time, modality, causation, free will, space and time, and universals and particulars.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Basic introductory concepts and a history of the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) are covered. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge representation and reasoning strategies used for AI problem solving. Solutions are found using the LISP programming language.Fall (ALT)

Prerequisites: CS 230 or CS 305

Credits: 4

Collection, examination, evaluation, morphology, function and diseases of blood cells. Hemostasis/coagulation of blood. Immunology theory is presented. Lab included.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Computational linguistics topics covered include regular expressions, finite state automata, information theory, context free grammars, hidden Markov models and Viterbi algorithms. Students will work on problems within the field including parsing, machine translation, speech recognition, information extraction and parsing.Fall (Alt)

Prerequisites: CS 210 or CS 230

Credits: 4

The course is an extension of Psyc 421 and includes an advanced examination of topics including: brain organization, neuronal signaling, and specific topics in the field of biological psychology.

Prerequisites: PSYC 420, PSYC 421, PSYC 425W (ONE course from that list, not all 3)

Credits: 3

A comparison of adaptation mechanisms, from cell to organ-system, used by animals in response to changes in environmental conditions such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, food availability, temperature, water, solutes, pressure and buoyancy.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106 or consent 

Credits: 1-4

This course provides students with an overview of the fundamental principles and current research on selected topics in developmental psychology through critical evaluation, discussion, and application. May be re-taken for credit. Specific course topics will be determined by the instructor.

Prerequisites: Psyc 433, Psyc 436, Psyc 343, Psyc 466: One course from this list, not all 4

Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics and interactions of inland freshwater lakes. Labs will emphasize field work, including data collection from five local lakes, analysis, and discussion.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Physical, social, emotional, intellectual, and personality development from conception to preadolescence. Focus on interplay between maturation and experience.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 3

A blend of Computer Science, Information Science, and Statistics for storing, accessing, modeling, and understanding large data sets. Topics include fundamental data mining algorithms: decision trees, classification, regression, association rules, statistical models, neural networks, and support vector machines.Spring-Alt

Prerequisites: CS 210 and STAT 354

Credits: 3

This course is a functional study of the heart and circulatory system.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to intelligent systems such as Basic Search Strategies, Basic Knowledge Representation and Reasoning, Basic Machine Learning, Advanced Search, Advanced Representation and Reasoning, Reasoning Under Uncertainty, Agents, Natural Language Processing, Advanced Machine Learning, Robotics, and Perception and Computer Vision. Prerequisite: Admission to Major or Permission

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

his course is designed to provide a survey of psychopathology in children. It introduces selected topics and issues relating to the emotional, social, cognitive, and behavioral health of children. The course will address problems in infants to adolescents in the home, school, and community. Topics will include models of ¿normal¿ and abnormal development, environmental and dispositional factors relating to behavior, psychopathology, etiology, assessment, and diagnosis of major childhood emotional and behavioral disorders. Discussion of treatment of behavior disorders will be included.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 4

Study of types, arrangements and special adaptations of human tissues. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 220 

Credits: 4

This class covers the development of the individual from the age of 11 to 19 years of age. Discussion will include aspects of both normal and abnormal development.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

An exploration of behavioral strategy, communication, learning, and social systems of animals, with emphases placed on the causes, evolution, ecological implications, and function of behavior at the individual and population level. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 

Credits: 3

Major philosophers and philosophies of the late 20th Century.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course provides the basis for understanding hormones and the mechanisms of their actions in both the normal and pathological states. Sample topics to be included are diabetes, osteoporosis, hormones of reproduction and current social and medical issues related to the course.

Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or BIOL 105 

Credits: 3

Discussion of philosophical issues in law by way of connecting legal problems to well-developed and traditional problems in philosophy, e.g., in ethics, political philosophy, and epistemology, and investigates the philosophical underpinnings of the development of law. The course takes an analytical approach to law (as opposed to historical sociological, political, or legalistic approaches) and devotes a substantial part of the semester to a major work on law written by a philosopher.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to information management such as indexing, relational databases, query languages, transaction processing, distributed databases, physical database design, data mining, information storage and retrieval and multimedia systems. Prerequisite: Admission to Major or Permission

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Plant functions such as water relations, mineral nutrition, translocation, metabolisms, photosynthesis, photorespiration, fat and protein metabolism, respiration, growth and development, phytohormones, reproduction and environmental physiology. Lab included. (One semester organic chemistry is recommended.)

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 217, one semester organic chemistry recommended. 

Credits: 3

Exploring factors affecting leadership and effective group processes through lectures and discussion of theories and findings and through experiential activities.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 4

Field identification of plants with emphasis on local flora. History systematic, techniques, plant biogeography, methods of plant collection, preservation, preparation of herbarium specimens are covered. Lab and field trips included.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

An in-depth examination of social psychological research in laboratory and field settings.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W, PSYC 340 or PSYC 358 

Credits: 4

Expands upon general principles of ecology to focus on the factors that regulate the distribution and abundance of plants, analysis of plant populations, and dynamics of plant communities. Lecture and lab (fieldwork) included. (Taking BIOL 217 is strongly recommended before taking this class.)

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent. BIOL 217 strongly recommended. 

Credits: 3

Study of philosophy done from a feminist perspective in areas such as metaphysics, epistemology or ethics.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to information assurance and security, such as defensive programming, threats and attacks, network security, cryptography, web security, platform security, security policy and governance, digital forensics, and secure software engineering. Prerequisite: Admission to Major or Permission

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

This course provides students with an overview of the fundamental principles and current research on selected topics in social psychology through critical evaluation, discussion, and application. May be re-taken for credit. Specific course topics will be determined by the instructor.

Prerequisites: PSYC 340, PSYC 358, PSYC 455, PSYC 460W (ONE course from list, not all 4)

Credits: 4

Advanced Cognitive Psychology introduces students to key research papers in the field of human cognition. Through reading, writing, and the study of experimental design, students will advance their understanding of cognitive psychology and develop their ability to critically review and evaluate research.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W, PSYC 325

Credits: 1-3

Intensive study of a single philosopher or topic.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to computational science such as modeling and simulation, processing, interactive visualization, data, information and knowledge, and numerical analysis. Prerequisite: Admission to Major or Permission

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Lecture/laboratory course that presents an integrated view of plant biology, crop science, ecology, sustainability and current issues in biotechnology. Course focuses on issues of global concern such as sustainable food production, cropping techniques, climate change responses, pest management and herbicides, resistance, biofuels, genetically modified crops, molecular pharming, and tissue culture. Fall.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106

Credits: 3

As an advanced coverage of data communication, this course explores principles, protocols, and performance evaluation techniques of advanced networking technologies. Topics include error detection and recovery, flow control, routing, data throughput, and performance analysis of existing and emerging Internet protocols. Variable

Prerequisites: CS 350 and STAT 354

Credits: 3

The principle and operation of instruments and their application to biological research. Types of instrumentation examined include spectroscopic, chromatographic, electroanalytic, radiographic, and imaging. Laboratory Information Management systems (LIMS) will also be examined. Emphasis is placed on GLP, GMP, and ISO 9000 practices.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, or consent 

Credits: 4

The application of engineering principles and skills as applied to fermentation and to biological product recovery. Prereq: BIOL 270 and one semester each of calculus, physics, and organic chemistry, taken concurrently with BIOL 456.

Prerequisites: BIOL 270 and one semester each of calculus, physics, and organic chemistry, taken concurrently with BIOL 456. 

Credits: 3

Emerging mobile and wireless data networks technologies covered include standard wireless protocols (e.g., Bluetooth, IEEE 802.11, RFID, and WAP), and development of mobile and wireless applications (e.g., J2ME, WML, Brew). Includes research, design and implementation of a wireless, mobile application.Variable

Prerequisites: CS 320 and CS 350

Credits: 4

Continuation of Biological Engineering Analysis I. The application of engineering principles and skills as applied to fermentation and to biological product recovery. Prereq: BIOL 453, taken concurrently with BIOL 457.

Prerequisites: BIOL 453, taken currently with BIOL 457 

Credits: 4

This course is designed to increase the student's awareness and understanding of abnormal psychology. Students will become familiar with clinical descriptions, course of onset, and treatment regimens specific to various disorders.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101

Credits: 3

In-depth analysis of major European existentialists such as Kierkegaard, Heidegger, and Sartre.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course studies the problems, methods, and algorithms of computational geometry. We will focus on the core problems and categories of the discipline: static problems, geometric query problems, and dynamic problems. Some additional attention will be given to numerical geometric problems (e.g., parametric surfaces). Prerequisite: CS 305 and Math 247 or permission of instructor.

Prerequisites: CS 305 and Math 247 or permission of instructor.

Credits: 3

Practical laboratory experience in biotechnology through the selection and development of a research project. Students are expected to spend an average of 12 hours per week on the project. Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 453

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 453 

Credits: 3

Continuation of Biotechnology Project/Laboratory I. Practical laboratory experience in biotechnology through the selection and development of a research project. Students are expected to spend an average of 12 hours per week on the project. Prereq: BIOL 456, taken concurrently with BIOL 454

Prerequisites: BIOL 456, taken concurrently with BIOL 454 

Credits: 3

A critical examination of current psychological approaches to the study of women's behavior and experience. The course will emphasize empirical ways of knowing and address psychological questions of central concern to women. Development of gender differences also will be explored.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 3

Aesthetic principles, theories, and the creative process. Theories of visual arts, music, literature, dance, etc.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course studies historical and current concepts and implementations of computer operating systems. Basic operating systems topics include processes, interprocess communication, interprocess synchronization, deadlock, memory allocation, segmentation, paging, resource allocation, scheduling, file systems, storage, devices, protection, security, and privacy.Spring

Prerequisites: CS 305 or EE 395

Credits: 3

A lecture course covering basic principles of toxicity evaluation in living organisms, mechanisms of responses to chemicals or physical agents within an overview of practical medical, environmental and science policy implications. Presentation of comparisons of specific organ and tissue reactions to toxins in a variety of species follow these introductory concepts. Prereq: BIOL 105W, 106, and 1 year of General Chemistry

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and 1 year of General Chemistry 

Credits: 1

A laboratory in conjunction with CS 460.

Prerequisites: CS 305, EE 395. Permission of instructor

Credits: 3

Analysis of product marketing and consumer purchasing strategies and their determinants. Prereq: 8 PSYC credits

Prerequisites: 8 PSYC credits 

Credits: 4

A lecture/laboratory course that focuses on anthropogenic and natural toxicants, mathematical modeling of the dispersion of chemical and physical agents in the environment, effects on species and ecosystems with a special section on aquatic risk assessment. The laboratory includes techniques in environmental toxicity and a genuine research project.

Prerequisites: BIOL 460 

Credits: 1

A seminar course that involves critical evaluation of published studies in toxicology, student presentations of a selected published manuscript and requires students to write a paper on one aspect of the course's topic area that semeter. Topic areas vary each time the course is offered. Prereq: BIOL 105W, 106, and General Chemistry Alt-Fall

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and General Chemistry 

Credits: 3

A lecture/laboratory course focusing on the steps necessary to start a research project from project definition through methods testing and evaluation, and a final report that includes a project flow chart. Third year students will have senior and/or graduate mentors. Prereq: BIOL 105W, 106, and General Chemistry Alt-Fall

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and General Chemistry 

Credits: 3

This course investigates some of the central philosophical issues in our thinking about film, including questions about narrative, ontology, ethical criticism of film, the role of artistic intentions in interpretation, artistic medium, and the art/entertainment distinction.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to graphics and visualization such as basic and advanced rendering, geometric modeling, computer animation and visualization. Topics include game programming with concentration on 3D graphics including modeling, rendering, and animation for computer games and graphic simulations. Programs are created using a current graphics and game development environment.

Prerequisites: Admission to major or permission.

Credits: 3

A lecture/laboratory course where students perform all aspects of their own designed research topic in toxicology while critically evaluating the progress of other projects as well. Students will be expected to keep timelines or develop modified timelines as necessary. The inverted triangle approach of project design will be examined and then included in all designs.

Prerequisites: BIOL 464 

Credits: 4

Aging process and development during the adult years; psychology and psychological concerns of the aging individual; dealing with death.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101

Credits: 3

A lecture course that examines mechanisms of drug action, physiological responses and adverse reactions from sensitivities or allergies through overdose. Prereq: BIOL 105W, 106, 230 and 1 year of General Chemistry

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and 1 year of General Chemistry 

Credits: 3

A lecture course that examines Minnesota State University, Mankato, as your own work place to develop reports on a selected group of chemical and physical hazards of the workplace. Evaluation methods and solutions to existing problems are developed with concise reporting skills. Prereq: BIOL 105W, 106 and 1 year of General Chemistry

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and 1 year of General Chemistry 

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to human computer interaction such as designing interaction, programming interactive systems, user-centered design and testing, new interactive technologies, collaboration & communication, statistical methods for HCI, human factors and security, design-oriented HCI, and mixed, augmented and virtual reality. This course builds on the use of modern compilers. Related topics covered include lexical scanning, parsing, type checking, code generation and translation, optimization, and compile-time and run-time support for modern programming languages.

Prerequisites: Admission to major or permission.

Credits: 4

Role of microorganisms in soil, air, water, sewage processes as well as methods of measurement and detection. Special emphasis on the role of microorganisms in bioremediation. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and BIOL 270 

Credits: 3

Viruses infect all living things, such as bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals (including humans). There are many viruses that cause significant human mortality and morbidity, such as influenza and smallpox viruses. However, the vast majority of viruses that infect humans have little or no negative impact on our health and well-being. This course will teach Virology by stressing the rules of replication that every virus must follow. The use of viruses as molecular tools, virus-host interactions, and current viral outbreaks will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and BIOL 270

Credits: 3

The nature of consciousness, mind and body relations, freedom of action.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Fundamental principles of humoral and cell mediated immunity and the application of these principles. Current experimental work in the different areas of immunology will be discussed. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and BIOL 270 

Credits: 3

This course examines the conceptual and philosophical complexities of efforts to understand the mind in science. Topics include the difference and similarities between humans and other animals, the nature of psychological explanation, and reductive strategies for explaining consciousness, intentionality and language. Fall

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course will cover bacterial, fungal, and viral human pathogens: what diseases they cause, how they cause disease, and how humans defend against and prevent those diseases. In the laboratory the student will isolate and identify pathogenic microorganisms using microbiological, biochemical, and immunological techniques.

Prerequisites: BIOL 270 

Credits: 3

Cognitive and epistemic issues surrounding sensory perception, including the nature of perception, its immediate objects, and its ability to deliver knowledge of the world.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course provides an overview of the procedures and processes of behavior change in applied contexts. Topics include functional assessment, behavioral intervention planning, and specific applied behavioral analytic interventions with an emphasis on non-aversive options.

Prerequisites: PSYC 211W 

Credits: 5

This course presents the physiology and genetics of microorganisms emphasizing those aspects unique to bacteria and archea. Topics include: energy production; biosynthesis of small molecules and DNA, RNA, and proteins; the formation of cell walls and membranes; microbial differentiation and behavior; and the genetic and biochemical regulation of these processes. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 270 

Credits: 3

Philosophical issues concerning the mental lives of non-human animals, with emphasis on consciousness, rationality, language, and implications for non-human animal ethics.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

The interface of behavioral and medical science is explored. Research on environmental and learning factors in the etiology and treatment of physical disease and rehabilitation is examined. Specific topics include pain management, medical compliance, behavior disorders in nursing homes and on chronic illnesses. Prereq: Three courses in PSYC

Prerequisites: Three courses in PSYC 

Credits: 4

The role microbes play in production and spoilage of food products, as prepared for mass market. Topics include foodborn pathogens, epidemiology and control, essential principles in sanitation including Hazard Analysis/Critical Control Point and ISO 9000 requirements. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106 and BIOL 270 

Credits: 4

This course will cover both eukaryotic and prokaryotic molecular biology including: DNA and RNA structure, transcription, regulation of gene expression, RNA processing, protein synthesis, DNA replication, mutagenesis and repair, recombination, and insertion elements. A number of important techniques used in recombinant DNA technology will be discussed and practiced.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 211

Credits: 3

Nature of explanations, causality, theoretical entities, and selected problems.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Study of theory and/or implementation topics related to software engineering such as software processes, project management, requirements engineering, software design, construction, verification and validation, reliability, and formal methods. These relate to advanced programming for general-purpose software development. Topics include tools and processes appropriate for employing object-oriented designs and programming within a significant software development environment and advanced data structures and algorithms, graphical user interfaces, and software development processes.

Prerequisites: Admission to major or permission.

Credits: 3

Provides experience with a wide variety of biological laboratory exercises to prepare prospective elementary teachers. Emphasis is on building knowledge, skills, and confidence. The course will cover major biological concepts and environmental education through classroom-ready examples selected to illustrate each concept.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course examines conceptual and philosophical issues in biology, the nature and scope of biological explanation and conflicts between evolutionary and religious explanations for the origin of life.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Building upon the introduction provided in CS 300, provides a formal presentation of software engineering concepts. Additional topics include alternative design methods, software metrics, software project management, reuse and re-engineering.Variable

Prerequisites: CS 300, CS 380 and MATH 121

Credits: 1

Experience in maintaining and supervising laboratories. For individuals desiring additional experience with students in laboratory situations.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Examines the nature and methods of alternative strategies of theory construction in the social sciences and the metaphysical and epistemological assumptions and implications of such strategies. For example can people, their behavior and norms of rationality be understood in naturalistic terms or must they be understood only in culturally local terms.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Provides an introduction to software quality assurance with focus on software testing processes, methods, techniques and tools. Topics include formal verification and validation techniques; black box and white box testing; integration, regression, performance, stress, and acceptance testing of software.Variable

Prerequisites: CS 300, CS 380 and MATH 354

Credits: 1

This class provides MAX scholars with an opporutnity to explore a set of topics related to achieving success in academic, professional and personal realms. Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers and industry members as well as student participants. Students will be required to participate in mentoring of lower division MAX scholarship recipients and provide written and oral presentations of various topics during the semester.Fall, SpringPrereq: Receipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent

Prerequisites: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent.

Credits: 2

Study of topics theory and/or implementation related to the fundamental differences that Platform-Based Development has over traditional software development addressing topics such as Web Platforms, Mobile Platforms, Industrial Platforms, and Game Platforms. Prerequisite: Admission to Major or Permission

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

Application of psychology to topics of current interest. May be retaken for credit.

Prerequisites: PSYC 101 

Credits: 4

A basic science methods course designed to prepare prospective junior and senior high life science teachers. Course will cover science teaching methods and support materials as they apply to life science teaching situations. Prereq: 16 credits BIOL

Prerequisites: 16 credits BIOL 

Credits: 3

A lecture/laboratory course that provides opportunity for prospective junior and senior high life science teachers to observe, practice, and refine their teaching skills. Students will work in a school setting and experience actual classroom.

Prerequisites: BIOL 485 

Credits: 17

The clinical internship and training include lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of nuclear medicine technology in affiliation with Mayo School of Health Sciences in Rochester, MN.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 17

The clinical internship and training include lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of nuclear medicine technology in affiliation with Mayo School of Health Sciences in Rochester, MN.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-5

Application of psychology to topics of current interest. May be retaken for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Students gain experience working with a team to solve a substantial problem in the field of computer science using concepts that span several topic areas in computer science. Class time focuses primarily on project design and implementation.SpringPrereq: Senior standing and successful completion of all core requirements

Prerequisites: Senior standing and successful completion of all core requirements.

Credits: 1-3

Topics to be announced. May be retaken for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

Special event of less than semester duration.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

A variable topic course designed for a selected topic in Biology. Workshops provide an intensive learning experience on a new topic in the Biological Sciences and/ or hands-on experiences in a current area not covered by other course offerings. The course involves background reading, demonstrations, and laboratory or field experiences.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

The first in a two-semester sequence of capstone design. Students build on the experience gained in CS 391W/392W to bring their research or project implementation and leadership to that expected of contributing computer scientists in industry or research. Course must be taken concurrently with CS 495.

Prerequisites: CS 301, CS 302, CS 303, CS 304, CS 392W

Credits: 4

The first in a two-semester sequence of capstone design. Students build on the experience gained in CS 391W/392W to bring their research or project implementation and leadership to that expected of contributing computer scientists in industry or research. Course must be taken concurrently with CS 495.

Prerequisites: CS 301, CS 302, CS 303, CS 304, CS 392

Credits: 1-6

.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

The second in a two-semester sequence of capstone design and the fourth project class overall. Students build on the experience gained in CS 391W/392W to bring their research or project implementation and leadership to that expected of contributing computer scientists in industry or research. Expectations include public presentation of project work, patent applications, and/or plan for commercialization of project. Course must be taken concurrently with CS 495.

Prerequisites: CS 491W and (CS 306, CS 401, CS 403, CS 406, CS 410, CS 420, CS 435, CS 440, CS 445, CS 450, CS 465, CS 470, CS 480, or CS 485)

Credits: 4

The second in a two-semester sequence of capstone design and the fourth project class overall. Students build on the experience gained in CS 391W/392W to bring their research or project implementation and leadership to that expected of contributing computer scientists in industry or research. Expectations include public presentation of project work, patent applications, and/or plan for commercialization of project. Course must be taken concurrently with CS 495.

Prerequisites: CS 491 and (CS 306, CS 401, CS 403, CS 406, CS 410, CS 420, CS 435, CS 440, CS 445, CS 450, CS 465, CS 470, CS 480, or CS 485)

Credits: 1-3

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Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

This class is for MAX scholars and covers topics related to achieving success in academic, professional and personal realms. Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers and industry members. Students will mentor lower division scholars and do presentations.Fall, SpringPrereq: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent

Prerequisites: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent 

Credits: 1-12

The clinical internship and training includes lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of cytotechnology. Instructor permission required.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-3

Workshop topics will be announced. Workshops on different topics may be taken for credit.

Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor

Credits: 1-12

Continuation of Cytotechnology Clinical Internship I. The clinical internship and training includes lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of cytotechnology. Instructor Permission required.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Restricted to Philosophy Honors students. Permission of department and instructor required.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

Students learn about computer science practice through seminars with faculty, graduate students, undergraduate students admitted to the CS major, visiting researchers, and industry members. CS students are assisted in their development as learners and professional citizens through workshops. This course is repeated by upper-division Computer Science students every semester.

Prerequisites: Admission to major.

Credits: 1-12

Continuation of Cytotechnology Clinical Internship II. The clinical internship and training includes lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of cytotechnology. Instructor Permission required.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Individualized research experience with a faculty mentor in the psychology department. You will gain specific research experience as designed by a faculty mentor. To register for this course, you must first apply and be accepted to join a psychology faculty members' research team.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

Restricted to Philosophy Honors students. Permission of department and instructor required.

Prerequisites: PHIL 495

Credits: 1-4

Special topics not covered in other courses. May be repeated for credit on each new topic. VariablePrereq: Consent

Prerequisites: Consent

Credits: 1-12

Continuation of Cytotechnology Clinical Internship III. The clinical internship and training includes lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of cytotechnology. Instructor Permission required.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Restricted to Cognitive Science Majors in their final year.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to utilize their training in a real-world environment. Participants work under the guidance and direction of a full-time staff member. (At most 4 hours towards the CS major.)Prereq: Permanent admission to the CS major, CS 300, consent

Prerequisites: Permanent admission to the CS major, CS 300, consent.

Credits: 1-8

A learning experience integrated with the student's course of study, to be developed with an advisor and the field experience coordinator. May be retaken for credit up to an 8 credit total for all enrollments. Available for P/N grading only. Prereq: 9 credits of PSYC

Prerequisites: 9 credits of PSYC 

Credits: 1-12

Experience in applied biology according to a prearranged training program for a minimum of five 40-hour weeks.

Prerequisites: Consent 

Credits: 4

Advanced study and research required. Topic of the senior thesis determined jointly by the student and the faculty advisor.Fall, Spring Prereq: Senior standing and consent

Prerequisites: Senior standing and consent

Credits: 1-12

Experience in applied biology according to a prearranged training program for a minimum of five 40 hour weeks. Only four credits can be applied to the major.

Prerequisites: Consent 

Credits: 1-6

Individual study of a philosopher or problem.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

Problems in the field of computer science are studied on an individual basis under the guidance of a faculty mentor.Fall, Spring Prereq: Consent

Prerequisites: Consent

Credits: 1-4

Individualized learning under faculty supervision.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

Individual Study

Prerequisites: none