Mechanical Engineering

Undergraduate Programs

Majors

Program Locations Total Credits
Mechanical Engineering BSME BSME - Bach Sci-Mechanical Engineering
  • Mankato
  • Mesabi Range
128

Certificates

Program Locations Total Credits
HVACR Engineering Design CERT
12

Policies & Faculty

Policies

Program Admission. Admission to the Mechanical Engineering Program is granted by the department, and is necessary before enrolling in 300- and 400-level courses. Near the end of the sophomore year, students must submit an application for admission to the mechanical engineering program. Applications to the program may be obtained from the Department of Mechanical and Civil Engineering or downloaded from the department homepage.

Before being admitted to upper division mechanical engineering courses, a student must complete a minimum of 25 credits, for grade, including the following courses applicable to the degree: General Physics (calculus based) 4 credits; Mathematics (Calculus I, Calculus II, Differential Equations) 12 credits; Engineering Mechanics (Statics, Dynamics, and Mechanics of Materials) 9 credits.

To be admitted to the mechanical engineering program, a student must earn a grade of “C” (2.00) or better and a cumulative GPA of 2.50 in the courses listed above. All transfer courses will be counted in this GPA calculation at the equivalent credit value awarded by Minnesota State University Mankato. Students who meet the above requirements but have transferred any of the Engineering Mechanics courses (Statics, Dynamics, or Mechanics) from another institution will be granted Provisional Admission.

All admitted students are required to take a department-administered diagnostic test early in their junior year.

Transfer Students. The department makes a special effort to accommodate transfer students. Transfer students are encouraged to contact the department as soon as possible to facilitate a smooth transition. Generally, no transfer credits are allowed for upper division mechanical engineering courses.

Satisfactory Progress. Once admitted to the mechanical engineering program, a student must demonstrate satisfactory progress by maintaining a cumulative GPA of at least 2.30 in all upper-division mechanical engineering courses as calculated by the Registrar.

P/N Grading Policy. P/N credit is not allowed for any course used to meet mechanical engineering degree requirements.

Probation Policy. An admitted student who does not maintain satisfactory progress as defined above will be placed on program probationary status for a maximum of one semester. During the probationary period, the student must complete at least 8 credits, approved by the department, of upper division engineering courses for grade from the prescribed Mechanical Engineering curriculum. Students may not receive a degree without first conforming to the satisfactory progress criteria. A student who fails to meet satisfactory progress for a second semester (consecutive or non-consecutive) will not be allowed to continue in the program.

Readmission to Program. A student who has failed to meet their Provisional or Probation requirements and who has been removed from the program may reapply to the program. A maximum of two admissions are allowed.

Appeals. A student may appeal any departmental decision in writing. The department will consider such appeals individually.

Contact Information

205 Trafton Science Center E

me.mnsu.edu

Faculty

100 Level

Credits: 1

This course offers an introduction to the various disciplines of engineering and their relationship to the principles of physics and mathematics. Students are prepared for academic success and the transition into an engineering program.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-12

Credits: 2

To prepare students for a career in engineering with emphasis on mechanical; introduce the engineering fundamentals and the skills necessary to have a successful learning experience; and to prepare students for engineering education and profession through interactions with upper-class engineering students and practitioners.

Prerequisites: ACT Math Subscore of 23 or higher.

Credits: 1

A continuation of ME 101 covering historical and global perspectives, engineering discipline and functions, professional aspects of engineering, ethical aspects of engineering, creativity and innovation, basics of personal computers-word processing and spreadsheets, introduction to problem solving.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

Standards of graphics communication. Orthographic projections, dimensioning, tolerancing, section views. Extensive use of modern software to create engineering drawings. Introduction to solid modeling of parts and assemblies. This course includes laboratory component.

Prerequisites: none

200 Level

Credits: 2

This course has two main parts. Part one covers problem solving and fundamentals of programming including data types, decision making, repetitive loops, and arrays. Engineering applications requiring programming are included. Part two covers engineering design philosophy and methodology, communication skills, and teamwork. A design project is also included. Coreq: ME 103, MATH 121

Prerequisites: ME 101 

Credits: 2

This course is intended to provide the students with an understanding of the principles and methodologies of geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. Topics include: Datums, Material condition symbols, Tolerances of Form and profile, Tolerances of orientation and runout, locations tolerances, and Virtual condition. This course includes laboratory component. Coreq: ME 103

Prerequisites: ME 103, ME 201 

Credits: 3

Resultants of force systems, equilibrium, analysis of forces acting on structural and machine elements, friction, second moments, virtual work.

Prerequisites: PHYS 221

Credits: 3

Kinematics and kinetics of particles, systems of particles and rigid bodies, work-energy, linear and angular impulse momentum, vibrations.

Prerequisites: ME 212 

Credits: 3

Load deformation, stress, strain, stress-strain relationship, buckling, energy concepts, stress analysis of structural and machine elements.

Prerequisites: ME 212 

Credits: 1

Communicating technical information about building systems including mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) systems. Students will learn to read and interpret mechanical plans as well as piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID).

Prerequisites: ME 103 or instructor permission or instructor permission.

Credits: 3

Fundamental concepts of thermodynamics. Thermal properties of substances and state equations. Conservation of mass, first and second laws. Examples of applications to different engineering systems.

Prerequisites: PHYS 221 

Credits: 3

Probability and statistics. Uncertainty, distributions. Numerical solution of algebraic, transcendental and differential equations. Numerical integration and differentiation. Structured programming language required. Prerequisite: CIVE 201 or ME 201 or EE107 with C (2.0) or better, ME 212 Co-requisite: MATH 321 Fall, Spring

Prerequisites: ME 212. Select one course from CIVE 201, EE 107, or ME 201 with "C" (2.0) or better).

Credits: 1

This class provides MAX scholars with an opportunity to explore a set of topics related to achieving success in academic, professional and personal realms. Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers and industry members as well as student participants. This course may be repeated and will not count towards graduation requirements.Fall, SpringPrereq: Recipient of MAX scholarship or instructor consent.

Prerequisites: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent.

Credits: 1-4

.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Basic principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer. First and second laws of thermodynamics and application to engineering systems and their design. Not for mechanical engineering major.

Prerequisites: PHYS 221 with “C-” (1.67) or better 

300 Level

Credits: 3

Physical principles of elastic and plastic deformation of materials. Dislocation theory. Fatigue, creep, fracture, hardness, phase diagrams and other mechanical phenomena in materials. Ceramics and composite materials. Residual stresses. Lecture and lab demonstrations.

Prerequisites: ME 223

Credits: 3

Introduction to fluid properties, fluid statics, buoyancy, fluid kinematics, Bernoulli's equation, control volume and differential approach to flow conservation equations, dimensional analysis, similitude, viscous flow in pipes, flow over immersed bodies, and pumps. Includes significant design component. Prerequisite: MATH 223, ME 214 Co-requisite: ME 241

Prerequisites: MATH 223, ME 214

Credits: 3

Steady and unsteady conduction. Free and forced convection. Heat transfer by radiation. Combined modes of heat transfer. Elements of heat exchangers design. Includes significant design component.

Prerequisites: ME 241, ME 321 

Credits: 3

Energy analysis and design of thermodynamic systems including power and refrigeration cycles. Thermodynamic relations. Application of thermodynamics to mixtures and solutions. Psychometrics. Introduction to chemical thermodynamics. Third law of thermodynamics. Includes significant design component.

Prerequisites: CHEM 191, ME 241

Credits: 3

Introduction to manufacturing, tribology, casting, bulk deformation, sheet metal forming, material removal, joining, polymers, powder metals, ceramics, automation, integrated systems. Design for manufacture. Includes significant design component.

Prerequisites: ME 206, ME 223 

Credits: 2

Experiments in Mechanical Engineering, load-deformation, load-failure, fatigue, impact, hardness. Introduction to traditional machining and material processing. This course includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Analysis of linear systems in the time and frequency domains. Physical systems modeled and analyzed using time domain techniques. Fourier and Laplace Transforms.

Prerequisites: ME 214, PHYS 222, EE 230, MATH 321

Credits: 0

Curricular Practical Training: Co-Operative Experience is a zero-credit full-time practical training experience for one summer and an adjacent fall or spring term. Special rules apply to preserve full-time student status. Please contact an advisor in your program for complete information.

Prerequisites: ME 201. At least 60 credits earned; in good standing; instructor permission; co-op contract; other Prerequisites may also apply.

400 Level

Credits: 3

Minimum design loads for buildings using ASCE 7 guidelines and load distribution. Analysis of determinate structural systems including the case of moving loads. Analysis of indeterminate structures using the flexibility and moment distribution methods. Use of software to enhance the analysis.

Prerequisites: ME 223 

Credits: 3

The application of the principles of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and heat transfer to the design and analysis of selected energy systems of current interest, such as nuclear, solar, geothermal, and also conventional systems. Lecture and design projects.

Prerequisites: ME 324, ME 329 

Credits: 3

Application of principles of mechanics to the design of various machine elements such as gears, bearings, springs, rivets, welding. Stresses in mechanical elements. Design factors, fatigue, manufacturability. Lectures and design projects. Includes significant design content.

Prerequisites: ME 214, ME 223 

Credits: 3

The application of mechanics to the design and analysis of motion and force transmitting systems. Optimum design. Includes significant design component.

Prerequisites: ME 417 

Credits: 3

This course provides the students with sound understanding of both solid modeling techniques and finite element analysis. It covers the major features as well as feature manipulation techniques. It also provides a background in deriving, understanding and applying the stiffness matrices and finite element equations for various types of finite elements and systems. Static stress analyses, sensitivity studies and optimization studies are covered. Includes significant design component. Prerequisite: ME 203, ME 324, ME 417 Fall

Prerequisites: ME 203, ME 324, ME 417

Credits: 3

Introduce anisotropic mechanics theories, engineering application of various composite materials, mechanical behaviors and fabrication of composites, experimental and theoretical approach for composite designs, contemporary issues such as nano/microcomposites. Includes significant design component.

Prerequisites: ME 223

Credits: 3

Analysis of heat and mass flow, design of heat exchangers and accompanying piping system. Methods of heat transfer enhancement, heat pipes. Includes significant design component.

Prerequisites: ME 324 

Credits: 3

Introduction to the theory of aerosols and particulate systems. Properties, behavior, and physical principles of aerosols; including particle size statistics. Brownian motion and diffusion, and coagulation. Application in areas such as environmental systems, respiratory deposition, bioterrorism, and materials processing.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

The first course in a two semester sequence that provides a complete design experience under professional guidance. The course covers: the product realization process, financial analysis, quality, patents, ethics and case studies. The students initiate a design project early in the semester to be completed in ME 438. Prereq: senior standing in ME

Prerequisites: ME 324, ME 329, ME 333, ME 336, ME 341, ME 417 

Credits: 3

Methods of energy conversion. Topics may include hydroelectric, geothermal, wind and solar power generation, as well as unconventional methods of energy conversion. Term design problems.

Prerequisites: ME 324, ME 329 

Credits: 1

Exploration of the principles and application of Building Information Modeling (BIM) in the HVAC&R industry. Course will include a practice project in the HVAC field using Autodesk Revit.

Prerequisites: Instructor Permission

Credits: 1

This course will focus on the typical HVAC&R systems and components in use today. Basic operation, advantages and disadvantages, as well as system integration will be discussed.

Prerequisites: ME 321, ME 324, ME 329 or instructor permission.

Credits: 3

This course introduces the concepts and roles of Design for Manufacturing and Assembly (DFMA) in product specification and standardization, design rules/principles for typical manufacturing and assembly (including manufacturing processes analysis and approach towards robust design and manual and automatic/robotic assembly) processes, methods of material, shape and process selections, design for quality and reliability, design for manual/automatic (robotic) assembly, case studies on design for manufacturing and assembly with/without the aid of software.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Experimental and analytical studies of phenomena and performance of fluid flow, heat transfer, thermodynamics, refrigeration and mechanical power systems. Extensive writing component.

Prerequisites: ME 291, ME 324, ME 329

Credits: 3

The second course of a two semester sequence providing a complete design experience and introduction to professional practice. This course includes: completion of the design project, design presentations, and the final design report. Students will prepare for and complete the Fundamentals of Engineering exam.

Prerequisites: ME 428 

Credits: 3

Refrigeration cycles and equipment, refrigerant properties, heating and cooling loads, psychometric analysis of air conditioning. Distribution of air conditioning medium and air quality as applied to design. Includes significant design component.

Prerequisites: ME 324, ME 329

Credits: 3

This course introduces the numerical methods used for solving partial differential and integral equations of the type commonly occurring in fluid mechanics and heat transfer. The course provides a background in geometry and mesh generation, solution processes, and post-processing. Error control and numerical stability will be discussed. Numerical solutions for selected problems in fluid mechanics and heat transfer will be derived. Students will learn to use a commercial CFD software package. Includes significant design component.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Application of principles of mechanics of materials and of material failure theories to the design and analysis of shafts, journal bearings, helical, bevel and worm gears, clutches, brakes, couplings, and flexible mechanical elements. Statistical considerations. Includes significant design content.

Prerequisites: ME 417

Credits: 3

Energy and residual methods, 2D and 3D problems in stress analysis. Application of steady and transient heat flow, hydrodynamics, creeping flow. Includes significant design component.

Prerequisites: ME 223 and ME 324 or instructor consent 

Credits: 3

Analysis of control systems using the methods of Evans, Nyquist and Bode. Improvement of system performance by feedback compensation. Introduction to digital control. Includes significant design component.

Prerequisites: ME 341 

Credits: 3

Synergistic combination of mechanical engineering, electronics, controls and programming in the design of mechatronic systems. Sensors, actuators and microcontrollers. Survey of the contemporary use of embedded microcontrollers in mechanical systems, case studies. Includes significant design component.

Prerequisites: ME 417, ME 463 

Credits: 2

Experiments in vibrations: Motion measurement, force measurement, free vibration, frequency response, impact response, noise, signal processing. Experiments in control: system modelling and characterization in the time and frequency domains, feedback and compensation, PID control, control of velocity and position. This course includes laboratory. Extensive writing component.

Prerequisites: ME 463 

Credits: 2

Experiments in vibrations: Motion measurement, force measurement, free vibration, frequency response, impact response, noise, signal processing. Experiments in control: system modelling and characterization in the time and frequency domains, feedback and compensation, PID control, control of velocity and position. This course includes laboratory.

Prerequisites: ME 463 

Credits: 1-4

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Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

To acquaint students with various engineering careers, various industries, and various societal and ethical problems. Prereq: senior standing in ME

Prerequisites: Senior standing in Mechanical Engineering 

Credits: 1

This class provides MAX scholars with an opportunity to explore a set of topics related to achieving success in academic, professional and personal realms. Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers and industry members as well as student participiants. Students will be required to participate in mentoring of lower division MAX scholarship recipients and provide written and oral presentations of various topics during the semester. The course may be repeated and will not count towards graduation requirements.Fall, SpringPrereq: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent

Prerequisites: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent.

Credits: 1

This class provides students pursuing a minor in Global Solutions in Engineering and Technology with an opportunity to explore a set of topics related to achieving success in advance of and following an international experience (internship, study abroad, etc.). Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers and industry members as well as student participants. Returning students will be required to participate in mentoring of students preparing for their international experience and provide written and/or oral presentations of various topics during the semester. This course is required both before and after participation in the international experience (min. 2 cr.)

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

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Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

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Prerequisites: none