Food Science Technology

Undergraduate Programs

Majors

Program Locations Total Credits
Food Science Technology BS BS - Bachelor of Science
  • Mankato
120

Policies & Faculty

Policies

Admission to major is granted by the Department of Biology and follows minimum University admission requirements:

  • a minimum of 32 earned semester credits hours
  • a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 

GPA Policy. A minimum GPA of 2.00 must be maintained in the major. 

P/N Grading Policy. All courses in the major must be taken for grade.

In addition to the specific requirements of the major, all university requirements must be met for graduation. This includes 120 credits of coursework, 40 credits of upper division courses (including those in the major), purple and gold course requirements, and two writing intensive courses. 

Contact Information

242 Trafton Science Center South

(507) 389-2786
http://cset.mnsu.edu/biology/programs/ugrad/

Faculty

000 Level

Below 100-level courses are remedial courses and do not apply to a major or minor.

Credits: 4

Basic mathematics skills integrating the fundamental operations of whole numbers, integers, fractions, decimals, percents, ratio and proportion with the elementary algebra topics of linear equations and inequalities, graphs, exponents, polynomials and factoring. Credit does not apply toward graduation.P/N only.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Topics covered include intermediate study of graphs, systems of linear equations, introduction to functions, linear and nonlinear inequalities, factoring, rational expressions and equations, radicals, and basic quadratic equations. Credit does not apply toward graduation.P/ N only.

Prerequisites: none

100 Level

Credits: 4

Introductory course designed for students not majoring in science. Focuses on basic biological principles with special emphasis on the human species. Includes scientific problem solving, biodiversity, human and social aspects of biology, ecology, cellular processes and organ function, human reproduction, pre-natal development, and heredity. Lecture, laboratory, and small group discussions.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03, GE-08

Credits: 4

This lecture and laboratory course investigates the world of chemistry, the nature of matter and our interactions with chemicals on a daily basis. This course is intended for non-science majors and is not a preparation for CHEM 111 or CHEM 201. Credit will not be given to students who have previously taken a chemistry course at or above Chem 111 and received a passing grade.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

Emphasizes individual growth and interpersonal relationships within our diverse society. Focuses on issues such as interpersonal communication, conflict resolution, mate selection, marriage and family issues, family strengths, stress and crises, parenting decision-making and parent-child relationships, resource management, and personal and family financial issues.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

Credits: 3

An overview of the scope of family consumer sciences and the career potentials of the profession.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2-4

Students focus on specific biological perspectives, including environmental science, biology of women, biotechnology, human heredity, etc. May be repeated for credit under different sub-titles.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

An introduction to biological topics of special interest to women with emphasis on anatomic and physiologic changes over the course of a woman's lifetime. Designed for students not majoring in science. Presents fundamental biologic concepts within this specialized context and provides opportunity to collect, evaluate, and analyze data.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

An introductory course designed for students not majoring in science. Focuses on basic biological principles as applied to biotechnology. Includes basic natural science principles, scientific problem solving, and human and social aspects of biotechnology. Lecture, laboratory, and small group discussions.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to general chemistry. It is a non-laboratory class designed to prepare students for CHEM 201 or to be utilized as a general education course. This course will address more mathematical relationships than CHEM 106. Credit will not be given to students who have previously taken a chemistry course at or above Chem 111 and received a passing grade.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 4

Study of biological processes at the suborganismal level including cell chemistry, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, and complex tissue physiology. Laboratory and discussion sessions stress problem solving and experimental design.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 4

Study of biological processes at the suborganismal level including cell chemistry, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, and complex tissue physiology. Laboratory and discussion sessions stress problem solving and experimental design.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

This course covers fundamental concepts required to understand the general chemistry in living organisms. This is a non-laboratory class. This chemistry course will not prepare students for any Chemistry course at or above the 200 level.

Prerequisites: Student must demonstrate math placement requirements at or above MATH 112 in the placement chart. See Mathematics for details.

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 4

Study of biological processes at the organismal level including a survey of life forms (viruses, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals), their evolution, and ecology. Laboratory and discussion sessions stress problem solving and experimental design.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 

Credits: 3

A survey of mathematics and its relationship to society, showing its development and evolution to meet the needs of mankind.

Prerequisites: Three years high school algebra/geometry or MATH 098

Goal Areas: GE-04

Credits: 5

This course is an introduction to organic chemistry and biological chemistry. The laboratory will reinforce lecture.

Prerequisites: CHEM 106 or high school chemistry 

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-03

Credits: 4

Concepts of algebra (real numbers, exponents, polynomials, rational expressions), equations and inequalities, functions and graphs, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices and determinants, conic sections, sequences and series, probability, and binomial theorem.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, or MATH 098 with grade of P. 

Goal Areas: GE-04

Credits: 3

Basic concepts of trigonometry as preparation for college level mathematics and science course work. Topics include concepts of algebra (real numbers, functions, graphs of functions, exponential and logarithmic functions), trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, applications of trigonometry, and analytic geometry.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, or MATH 112 with “C” (2.0) or better. 

Goal Areas: GE-04

Credits: 4

This course will cover topics of precalculus mathematics. Topics covered will include functions, graphs of functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices, trigonometric functions, circular functions, vectors and complex numbers, induction, series and probability.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Math Placement Table in this section, or grade of P in MATH 098.

Goal Areas: GE-04

Credits: 2

Relationship of clothing to people from cultural, social, psychological, economic and aesthetic perspectives.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 4

Limits, continuity, the derivative and applications, transcendental functions, L'Hopital's Rule, and development of the Riemann integral.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, MATH 115 or both MATH 112 and MATH 113 with “C” (2.0) or better.

Goal Areas: GE-04

Credits: 4

Techniques of integration, applications of integration, improper integrals, numerical integration, the calculus of parametric curves, infinite series and sequences, and vectors in two and three dimensions.

Prerequisites: MATH 121 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent 

Credits: 2

A continuation of the study of calculus from MATH 121 including transcendental functions, L'Hopital's rule, techniques of integration, and vectors in two and three dimensions. Content is intended for students enrolled in any engineering technology program. Credit for both MATH 127 and MATH 122 is not allowed.

Prerequisites: MATH 121 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 4

This course develops concepts and skills in algebra and introductory calculus needed to model applications in business, economics, social sciences and life sciences, using polynomials, exponentials, logarithms, linear systems, linear programming, sequences, series, derivatives and integrals.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, or grade of “C” (2.0) or better in either MATH 112 or MATH 115.

Goal Areas: GE-04

Credits: 3

This chemistry course explores the scientific methods used in criminal investigations. Course topics will include discussions of different kinds of evidence, how to select and analyze samples, and especially how to interpret results of scientific tests. Specific topics will include the analysis of DNA, drugs, accelerants and explosives, and other organic and inorganic compounds. Case studies will be used as examples throughout the course. There will also be discussions concerning the ethics of analysis and uses of forensic data.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03, GE-09

Credits: 3

This course will explore the scientific, pharmacological, neurochemical and cultural aspects of psychoactive substances. The material is presented intuitively, with no mathematics. Course topics will include discussions of the major classes of pharmaceutical and psychoactive substances, basic neurochemistry, the role of psychoactive substances in medicine, the ritual use of psychoactive substances by traditional cultures, the FDA approval process, the significance and implications of drug testing, the controversy of drug-induced behavioral modification, national and global perspectives of substance abuse and the ethics of legalization. V

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

An online course introducing the science related to sports issues including nutrition, movement, equipment selection, and healthy exercising/training.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

An introductory nutrition class which emphasizes the scientific method and natural science principles from biochemistry, physiology, chemistry, and other sciences to explain the relationships between food and its use by the human body for energy, regulation, structure, and optimal health. GE-3 non-lab

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

Introduces students to basic food preparation and culinary techniques. Students look at different cultures and the roles of individuals and nations in a global context using food habits as a model.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Students will learn the rudiments of algorithmic processes such as iteration and recursion and implement simple mathematical algorithms in a commonly used mathematical software package. Applications may include graphing, equation solving, numerical approximation, recurrence relations, and generation of mathematical objects such as sets, lists, permutations and trees.

Prerequisites: MATH 121

Credits: 1

An introduction to the health care profession with special emphasis on clinical laboratory personnel. Course includes presentations by professionals in some of the major health care fields, especially medical technology. Includes lectures, field observations.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the mathematical concepts needed in computer science, including sets, logic, representations of numbers, counting techniques, discrete functions, matrices, trees and graphs, and algorithm analysis.

Prerequisites: MATH 112 or equivalent, with “C” (2.0) or better, or consent

Goal Areas: GE-04

Credits: 3

This course presents the concepts of the differential and integral calculus from an intuitive (non-theoretical) point of view. The course emphasis is on the applications of calculus. Credit for both MATH 181 and MATH 121 is not allowed.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, or Math 112 with “C” (2.0) or better.

Goal Areas: GE-04

Credits: 1

This course is designed for those students who struggle with Chem 191. Students will learn study skills and time management skills that will aid in their success in Chem 191. Students will also refresh concepts that were learned in high school or previous college chemistry courses.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-03

Credits: 3

From an engineering perspective, concepts of general chemistry will be investigated. Topics include atomic structure, stiochiometry, gas laws, periodic trends chemical bonds, thermodynamics, kinetics and organic chemistry.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry or “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 104. Student must demonstrate math placement requirements at or above MATH 115 in the placement chart. See Mathematics for details.

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-03

200 Level

Credits: 1

General chemistry lab for students who successfully have completed a general chemistry lecture course elsewhere and transferred to MSU. The transfer course must be accepted by the Chemistry Department as content/level appropriate and the MSU major must require Chemistry 201. This course requires special permission. Prerequisite: college level general chemistry lecture.

Prerequisites: CHEM 191

Credits: 5

Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics and states of matter. Laboratory will reinforce lecture concepts. Prereq: C or higher in MATH 112 or the equivalent; high school chemistry or C or higher in CHEM 104

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in MATH 112 or the equivalent; high school chemistry or “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 104.

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-03

Credits: 3

Nature of mathematics from a problem solving approach using sets, relations, number systems through integers, rational numbers and discrete mathematics.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, or Grade of P in MATH 098 or "C" (2.0) or better in MATH 112 or MATH 115.

Goal Areas: GE-04

Credits: 5

Continuation of the basic principles of chemistry including properties of solutions, kinetics, acids and bases, equilibria, buffers, precipitation reactions, electron transfer reactions, electrochemistry, entropy and free energy. Laboratory will reinforce lecture concepts.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 201 

Credits: 3

A continuation of MATH 201, including rational and real number systems, informal geometry and measurement, statistics, and probability.

Prerequisites: MATH 201, with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

Transformational and Euclidean geometry, coordinate geometry and applications of discrete mathematics.

Prerequisites: MATH 202 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 4

Introduction to genetic analysis. Topics covered will include those of both classical and modern genetics: population genetics, molecular genetics, genetic manipulation of organisms and selection. Central to this course will be the primacy of the trait as the object of genetics and the development/refinement of the concept of the gene. Lab included.Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and MATH 112 

Credits: 4

Principles of the study of relationships between organisms and the environment. Topics include flow of energy and materials, organism-level interactions, growth and evolution of populations, and community ecology. Field trips to prairie, lake, stream, and forest communities, training in data collection and analysis, use of equipment, and report writing. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 or consent 

Credits: 4

Biology of plants including unique features of plant cells, life histories, metabolism, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. The course empathizes plants' remarkable adaptations to their environments, their diversity, and the vital roles they play in ecological interactions. For biology and environmental science majors and minors. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 or consent 

Credits: 4

Systems approach to the structure of the human body. The course is designed for students majoring in biology or health related programs. Lab included.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Surfaces, vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integration, and vector calculus.

Prerequisites: MATH 122 with “C” (2.0) or better, or consent

Credits: 3

The science of six nutrient classes, including digestion through metabolism, and application of nutrition knowledge to clinical care, including weight control and common chronic conditions requiring nutrition therapy.

Prerequisites: BIOL 220, CHEM 106 or CHEM 111

Credits: 4

Matrices, determinants, systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, and characteristic value problems.

Prerequisites: MATH 122 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

Principles of food services operations related to menu planning, standardized recipes, production and service for profit and nonprofit settings.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course will provide students with knowledge of appropriate health, safety, and nutrition practices implemented in developmentally appropriate educational programs for children ages birth through eight years. Emphasis includes childhood acute and chronic illness, social, emotional and environmental health, health appraisals, health practices, safety promotion and first aid.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

An introduction to the general principles and methods used in the study of microorganisms. Lab included. Prereq: One BIOL course and one semester of chemistry from among CHEM 104, CHEM 106, CHEM 111, or CHEM 201. Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: One BIOL course and one semester of chemistry from among CHEM 104, CHEM 106, CHEM 111, or CHEM 201 

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

Physical, psychological, social, and managerial aspects of housing. Reciprocal relationship between housing and people. Guidelines and basic principles in planning for individual and family needs.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Economic decision making related to achieving maximum satisfaction from resources spent in the marketplace on housing, food, clothing, transportation, and other dimensions of the family. Basic information about the functions and responsibilities of the consumer, laws and agencies affecting consumer well-being and sources of help.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Provides experience with a wide variety of biological laboratory exercises to prepare prospective elementary teachers. Emphasis is on building knowledge, skills, and confidence. The course will cover major biological concepts and environmental education through classroom-ready examples selected to illustrate each concept.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to mathematical concepts needed in computer science, including sets, relations and functions, propositional logic, proof techniques, recurrence relations, graphs and trees, and discrete probability. This course is not intended for students pursuing a degree in mathematics.

Prerequisites: MATH 121 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent.

Credits: 1

The course will cover aspects of the ethical conduct of research, chemical safety, and preparation for a profession related to chemistry or biochemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM 322

Credits: 1

This class provides MAX scholars with an opportunity to explore a set of topics related to achieving success in academic, professional and personal realms. Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers and industry members as well as student participants. NOTE: Credit does not apply to any major.Fall, SpringPrereq: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent

Prerequisites: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent.

Credits: 3

Nature and scope of family and consumer sciences (FCS) education for grades 5-12. Principles and application of traditional, career/technical and critical science FCS education perspectives studied. Presentation of varied FCS teaching methods and techniques.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Logic, proof techniques, set theory, relations, functions, cardinality, operations, and an introduction to mathematical structures and number theory.

Prerequisites: MATH 122 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent.

Goal Areas: GE-02

Credits: 1

This class provides MAX scholars with an opportunity to explore a set of topics related to achieving success in academic, professional and personal realms. Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers, and industry members as well as student participants. Cannot be used towards a math major.

Prerequisites: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent.

Credits: 1-6

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Prerequisites: none

300 Level

Credits: 3

Study of the family from a historical perspective; in terms of the family system and the broader ecological system; in terms of stresses faced and coping responses. This course will address issues at each of four life stages: infancy and early childhood; the school years; transition from school to adult life; and the adult years.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

Evolution is a unifying theory of biology. Students are provided the history of evolutionary thought and the Darwinian revolution, evidence for evolution, mechanics of evolution, and an array of special topics such as speciation, molecular evolution, conservation, and extinction. Readings will include book chapters and journal articles. Lecture/discussion.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 211

Credits: 3

Study of the role of the family in the development of the young child. Provide teachers and care providers with knowledge and understanding of family systems and appropriate interactions with families. Students will participate in a service learning activity.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Introduction to the principles of chemical analysis, with emphasis on classical methods of analysis. Lectures will stress the theory of chemical measurements and sample handling. Laboratory exercises will provide students with opportunities to explore calibration methods, method development, and established procedures for volumetric and gravimetric analyses. Basic atomic spectroscopy is also presented.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 202 

Credits: 4

Principles of functions of human cells, organs, and systems with an emphasis on organ/system interactions. Designed for majors that do not require a strong medical and research emphasis. Includes an active learning laboratory to facilitate learning the complex lecture material.

Prerequisites: BIOL 220, CHEM 104 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or CHEM 201

Credits: 3

This course is designed to survey descriptive main group chemistry and augment General Chemistry's introduction to solid state and nuclear chemistry.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 202 

Credits: 3

Limits, sequences, continuity, and differentiation of a real valued function of a real variable.

Prerequisites: MATH 223 and MATH 290 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

A comprehensive phylogenetic survey of both invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Emphasis on evolutionary relationships among phyla, the evolution of organ systems, animal organization and function, animal adaptations, and zoogeographical considerations. Research and inquiry of animal unity and diversity will include using the Internet. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 

Credits: 3

This course is designed to address transition metal chemistry, introduce bonding theory, nomenclature, reactivity and mechanisms for transition metal compounds. It will also address and use examples from bioinorganic chemistry and catalysis.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 202 

Credits: 4

An examination of eukaryotic cellular structure, organization and physiology. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106, BIOL 211 

Credits: 4

This course presents the theory, computations, and applications of first and second order differential equations and two-dimensional systems.

Prerequisites: MATH 122 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 4

Introduction to organic nomenclature, structure, bonding, chemical reactivity, organic acid-base reactions, mechanisms and stereochemistry. IR, MS, and NMR spectroscopy will be introduced. The chemistry of alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, alkynes, and alcohols will be covered. Laboratory illustrates synthetic techniques and the preparation and reactions of functional groups discussed during lecture.

Prerequisites: CHEM 202, “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 202.

Credits: 1

This course is a supplement to Chem 322 and includes a brief coverage of functional groups and their chemistry not previously covered that are important in biochemistry. This course is intended only for students taking, or who have taken, only one semester of organic chemistry and who plan to take Chem 360, Principles of Biochemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM 322

Credits: 3

This course is a continuation Chem 322 and includes organic nomenclature, structure, bonding, chemical reactivity, organic acid-base reactions, and reaction mechanisms; the chemistry of ethers, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds, polyenes, ketones, aldehydes, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and alpha carbonyl compounds and synthetic transformations is covered.

Prerequisites: CHEM 322 with a "C" (2.0) or higher.

Credits: 3

Basic anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. The course is designed for students majoring in biology, psychology or health related programs.

Prerequisites: BIOL 220 

Credits: 1

Laboratory will highlight common techniques including recrystallization, melting point determination, simple and fractional distillation, extraction, gas and thin layer chromatography, and chemical and spectroscopic qualitative analysis. Single and multi-step syntheses illustrating aromatic and carbonyl chemistry will be performed.

Prerequisites: CHEM 324

Credits: 4

Principles of functions of human cells, organs, and systems with an emphasis on organ/system interactions. This course is designed for students majoring in biology, chemistry, or related sciences, and medically-related areas. Includes a laboratory with a research and medical emphasis.

Prerequisites: BIOL 220, CHEM 104 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or CHEM 201

Credits: 4

Introduction to principles and hands on application of construction techniques for clothing and home furnishings. Emphasis on terminology, equipment, application and practice of sewing skills. Emphasis on consumer aspect of textiles and applications. Student projects will be aligned with sewing skills and experience.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course covers several geometric systems including Euclidean, non-Euclidean, transformational and projective. Other topics studied are topological properties and the relationship between coordinate and synthetic geometry.

Prerequisites: MATH 290 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 4

Study of why, how, and when physical and chemical phenomena occur during the preparation of food and its products. Includes discussion and laboratory experience demonstrating how preparation methods affect food quality, composition, and nutritive value. Includes NRA ServSafe certification.

Prerequisites: FCS 150

Credits: 3

Planning, preparing and serving meals with emphasis on effective management, nutritive needs, purchasing, and equipment. Includes quantity food service laboratory.

Prerequisites: FCS 252, FCS 340, FCS 350 

Credits: 4

An introduction to the theory of groups and rings; including polynomial rings, homomorphisms, isomorphisms, and concepts of normal subgroups, ideals, quotient groups, and quotient rings.

Prerequisites: MATH 290 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

Principles of food services management related to budgeting, food safety and operational sanitation, analysis and control of quality and quantity in institutional and public food service operations.

Prerequisites: FCS 252 

Credits: 4

A calculus based introduction to probability and statistics. Topics include probability, random variables, probability distributions (discrete and continuous), joint probability distributions (discrete and continuous), statistical inference (both estimation and hypothesis testing), confidence intervals for distribution of parameters and their functions, sample size determinations, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation. This course meets the needs of the practitioner and the person who plans further study in statistics.

Prerequisites: MATH 122 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 4

Analysis of the structure and metabolism of biologically important compounds. This intermediate-level course is designed for students in the medical technology, food science, chemistry education, chemistry and pre-professional health majors. The laboratory teaches basic biochemical techniques.

Prerequisites: Either CHEM 322 and CHEM 324 or CHEM 322 and CHEM 323. “C” (2.0) or higher in all prerequisites 

Credits: 3

This course is an in-depth examination and discussion of the many complex dynamics that make up romantic relationships. A diverse set of relationship topics are covered, including attachment, intimacy building and conflict diffusing strategies. Open discussion, critical thought, and application are encouraged via classroom and online opportunities.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

MATH 375 Introduction to Discrete Mathematics (4 credits)An introduction to the concepts fundamental to the analysis of algorithms and their realization. Topics will include combinatorics, generating functions, recurrence relations, graph theory, and networks.

Prerequisites: MATH 247 and MATH 290 with grade of “C” (2.0) or higher.

Credits: 3

Basic understanding of the principles of immunohematology applied to the area of blood blanking including major blood group systems, principles for antigen/antibody detection and identification, donor blood collection, transfusion evaluation, theory of renal function in health and disease, specimen collection, handling, and processing, and components of routine urinalysis.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

A continuation of the topics from MATH 280. The major focus of the course is understanding and analyzing algorithms, including proving that algorithms perform correctly. Topics include modular arithmetic, counting problems, sorting algorithms and constructions on graphs. This course is not intended for students pursuing a major degree in mathematics.

Prerequisites: MATH 247 and MATH 280 with a grade of “C” (2.0) or better.

Credits: 0

Curricular Practical Training: Co-Operative Experience is a zero-credit full-time practical training experience for one semester and an adjacent fall or spring term. Special rules apply to preserve full-time student status. Please contact an advisor in your program for complete information.

Prerequisites: At least 60 credits earned; in good standing; instructor permission; co-op contract; other prerequisites may also apply.

Credits: 1

This course is designed to provide hands-on research experience to RISEbio scholars. Students taking this course will be involved in an original research project. Using a variety of methods, students will collect original data and contribute to problem solving in the biological sciences. As an early research experience, emphasis will be placed on the process of scientific research, including formulation of a research plan, data collection, assessment of data quality and interpretation based on available data. Students are required to keep a lab notebook and present their findings to classmates and a wider audience.

Prerequisites: none

400 Level

Credits: 3

An analysis of culturally diverse family systems in America; emphasis on relationships within the family and with the larger community across the family life cycle.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 3

The course is a study of development through the family life cycle. Emphasis on developmental interaction and systems theory.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

An introduction to topological spaces and their fundamental properties such as compactness, connectedness, separation properties and countability properties. Continuous functions between topological spaces and common examples of topological spaces are also discussed.

Prerequisites: MATH 290 with grade of “C” (2.0) or higher. 

Credits: 3

An examination of the important role that play has in the cognitive, emotional, physical, and social development of the child from birth to adolescence.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

The structure and function of stream ecosystems are presented with emphasis on adaptations of organisms to stream life and connections between stream organisms, the aquatic environment, and the surrounding watershed. Includes lab, field work, and team projects. Prereq: BIOL 105W, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consentSummer

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent

Credits: 3

Examination of how adolescents' development are affected by their relationship with their parents and with their peers.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Applications of principles from ecology, genetics, behavior, demography, economics, philosophy, and other fields to the conservation and sustainable use of natural populations of plants and animals. Lectures and discussions address topics such as habitat fragmentation, parks and reserves, genetic diversity, population viability, and extinction.

Prerequisites: BIOL 215 or consent 

Credits: 4

To provide students the values and functions of wetlands and to use wetlands as an example of the relationship of ecology to management, and the impact that classification systems have politically. Lab (fieldwork) included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215, or consent 

Credits: 3

An introduction to fish biology and fisheries management, diversity, form, and function in the aquatic environment, functional physiology, evolution and speciation, identification and use of keys, ecology, and management topics.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215, or consent of instructor

Credits: 3

The sources of various elements and chemical reactions between them in the atmosphere and hydrosphere are treated. Current research topics relevant to the field of environmental chemistry will also be addressed. Laboratory excercises will emphasize proper sampling technique and various analytical methods for quantifying environmentally important components.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 305 

Credits: 4

A field course in the ecology of birds, mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and fishes. Students are trained in sampling techniques such as mark-and-recapture, population size estimation and monitoring, and species identification of live and preserved specimens. Lectures encompass evolution and adoption, origins, energetics, mating systems, morphology, geographical distributions, and population-level phenomena. Lecture and Laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent 

Credits: 4

A field course focused on the function and dynamics of various North American ecosystems. Emphases will be on natural history, critical thought, and experimental design. Students will be trained in a variety of soil, plant, and animal sampling techniques. Depending on enrollment, there may be additional costs (e.g., camping fees) for the course.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent 

Credits: 3

This class examines the effects of natural and human-induced changes in climate on terrestrial and marine ecosystems. The course focuses on the science behind global change issues that have biological, social, and economic implicatons.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent 

Credits: 4

Algebra and geometry of complex numbers, analytic functions, power series, Cauchy's theorem and residue theorem.

Prerequisites: MATH 223 and MATH 290 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

This course will examine multiple facets of human genetics. The modern human genome is not a static entity but one that arose from a dynamic combination of inputs from multiple human species, effects from the environment, and their mixture over time. The first third of the course will study ancient human genetics and their contributions to our genome, the second will study human ancestry and migration patterns, and human population genetics. The final third of the course will investigate the modern human genome, genetic diseases, genetic engineering of our genome, and the future of human genetics and its ethical implications.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Soil ecology will focus on the genesis and classification of soils, the physical properties of soil as they relate to habitat formation, niches, interactions that exist among soil organisms, human impact on soil systems relative to population pressures and management practices. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215, or consent 

Credits: 3

Students are provided information of past and present policies that impact underserved families nationally and internationally. Students will identify, review, and discuss family policy using relevant and applicable theory. This course will advance student knowledge for careers in family policy as well as becoming an ethically-minded advocate and/or professional. Students will be provided a variety of opportunities to develop their knowledge and professional writing skills in the subject matter.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 4

The topology of Euclidean spaces, compact and connectedness, properties of continuous functions, differentiation, basic theory of Riemann-Stieltjes integration and the fundamental theorem of Calculus.

Prerequisites: MATH 223 and MATH 290 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent 

Credits: 3

This course contains content associated with challenging entry-level certifications for wellness coaching. Health behavior change strategies are emphasized within the context of the health coaching theory, coaching relationship skills, well-being assessment, and goal setting.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Emphasis is placed on the biomedical aspects of aging and chronic disease. The course is designed for students majoring in biology, gerontology programs, or other health related programs.

Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or BIOL 105 

Credits: 3

A continuation of Math 417. The course may include topics from metric spaces, Riemann-Stieltjes integration, differentiation in Euclidean space, sequences and series of functions, approximation theorems, implicit and inverse function theorems, equicontinuity, and mapping theorems.

Prerequisites: MATH 417 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 2

This course is designed to emphasize the theoretical foundations of physical inorganic chemistry. Course topics include: bonding theory, quantum mechanics and periodic trends, symmetry and group theory.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 322, MATH 121 

Credits: 3

In-depth study and practice of nutrition assessment techniques including dietary histories, anthropometrics, physical signs and symptoms, and laboratory interpretation in various age groups and conditions. Students will use findings to determine nutritional needs and make nutritional diagnoses.

Prerequisites: FCS 242

Credits: 4

Clinically important parasites. Protozoans, Flukes, Tapeworms, Roundworms, Ticks, Mites and Insects. Designed for Medical Technology, Pre-Med, Pre-Vet and Biology majors. Identification, clinical disease, epidemiology and ecology are covered. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or BIOL 105, BIOL 106 recommended 

Credits: 3

Morphological, physiological, medical, and economic significance of insects.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 or consent 

Credits: 4

This course presents the theory, computations, and applications of partial differential equations and Fourier series.

Prerequisites: MATH 223 and MATH 321 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 4

Spectroscopic techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and mass spectrometry for determining structural features of molecules will be covered. Spectroscopic methods emphasize interpretation of spectra, and also provide hands-on operation of the corresponding electronic instruments. The laboratory uses these techniques for the determination of the structures of a series of unknown compounds.

Prerequisites: CHEM 324, CHEM 325. “C” (2.0) or higher in all prerequisites 

Credits: 3

Understanding the process of cell differentiation and development. Special emphasis will be placed on the genetic, molecular, and cellular mechanisms that direct the development of multicellular organisms. Course to include current areas of research and other timely topics.

Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or BIOL 105 

Credits: 3

Advanced synthetic organic reactions and their mechanisms. Laboratory will include examples of some of this chemistry, and techniques for reaction monitoring and product purification.

Prerequisites: CHEM 324. “C” (2.0) or higher

Credits: 4

This course presents topics from mathematical analysis of both discrete and continuous models taken from problems in the natural sciences, economics and resource management.

Prerequisites: MATH 223 and MATH 247 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 1

Biology 425 is an optional 1-credit laboratory addition to Developmental Biology, Biology 424. In the laboratory component, students will be exposed to modern techniques used to examine developmental processes in several key model systems. Laboratory exercises consist of experiments designed to demonstrate fundamental concepts in development and to familiarize students with experimental approaches utilized in studying developmental biology and embryology.

Prerequisites: BIOL 211; Co-requisite: BIOL 424

Credits: 4

Simplex method and its variants, duality, sensitivity analysis, interior-point methods, quadratic programming and linear complementarity problems. Applications such as classification problems and game theory with linear optimization software.

Prerequisites: MATH 122, MATH 247

Credits: 4

Collection, examination, evaluation, morphology, function and diseases of blood cells. Hemostasis/coagulation of blood. Immunology theory is presented. Lab included.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

A comparison of adaptation mechanisms, from cell to organ-system, used by animals in response to changes in environmental conditions such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, food availability, temperature, water, solutes, pressure and buoyancy.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106 or consent 

Credits: 4

This course is an introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological characteristics and interactions of inland freshwater lakes. Labs will emphasize field work, including data collection from five local lakes, analysis, and discussion.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course is a functional study of the heart and circulatory system.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2

The synthesis and properties of organic macromolecules, especially industrially important polymers, and the chemistry of other industrially important chemical reactions and processes.

Prerequisites: CHEM 324. “C” (2.0) or higher 

Credits: 4

Geometry of spaces including Euclidean and non-Euclidean and applications of contemporary geometry.

Prerequisites: MATH 247 and MATH 290 with grade of "C" (2.0) or higher or consent.

Credits: 4

Study of types, arrangements and special adaptations of human tissues. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 220 

Credits: 4

An exploration of behavioral strategy, communication, learning, and social systems of animals, with emphases placed on the causes, evolution, ecological implications, and function of behavior at the individual and population level. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 

Credits: 3

This course provides the basis for understanding hormones and the mechanisms of their actions in both the normal and pathological states. Sample topics to be included are diabetes, osteoporosis, hormones of reproduction and current social and medical issues related to the course.

Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or BIOL 105 

Credits: 3

Provides in-depth exploration of the dietary needs of physically active individuals across the lifespan. Its laboratory component will focus on performance and interpretation of assessments commonly used to determine dietary and physiological status.

Prerequisites: FCS 140 or FCS 242

Credits: 3

An advanced nutrition course in human metabolism, emphasizing the function and interaction of nutrients in metabolic and physiologic processes. A grade of 'C' must be attained in CHEM 111 and BIOL 330 before taking this course.

Prerequisites: BIOL 330, CHEM 111, FCS 242 

Credits: 4

Plant functions such as water relations, mineral nutrition, translocation, metabolisms, photosynthesis, photorespiration, fat and protein metabolism, respiration, growth and development, phytohormones, reproduction and environmental physiology. Lab included. (One semester organic chemistry is recommended.)

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 217, one semester organic chemistry recommended. 

Credits: 4

Euclidean algorithm, primes, composites, number theoretic functions, congruencies, Diophantine equations, Euler and Fermat theorems, algebraic number fields.

Prerequisites: MATH 345 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

The role and influence of dietetics in society, nutritional assessment and care plans, dietetic principles applied to normal and malnourished states. Case-based approach.

Prerequisites: FCS 420, FCS 440, HLTH 321

Credits: 4

Field identification of plants with emphasis on local flora. History systematic, techniques, plant biogeography, methods of plant collection, preservation, preparation of herbarium specimens are covered. Lab and field trips included.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Expands upon general principles of ecology to focus on the factors that regulate the distribution and abundance of plants, analysis of plant populations, and dynamics of plant communities. Lecture and lab (fieldwork) included. (Taking BIOL 217 is strongly recommended before taking this class.)

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent. BIOL 217 strongly recommended. 

Credits: 3

Food quality, safety, formulation, processing, preservation, and biotechnology are explored. Original food science experiments are planned, executed, interpreted, and presented using appropriate scientific techniques.

Prerequisites: ENG 271W, FCS 340, HLTH 475 

Credits: 4

Detailed treatment of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. Topics include equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, phase and reaction equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and thermodynamic properties of polymers, solutions, and of biochemical and electrochemical processes. Prerequisite: Chem 305, Math 121, Physics 211. ¿C¿ (2.0) or higher in all prerequisites.

Prerequisites: MATH 121, PHYS 211, CHEM 305

Credits: 4

A continuation of MATH 345. The course will include topics from groups, rings, and fields.

Prerequisites: MATH 345 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

Study of nutritional needs of pregnancy, infancy, childhood, and adulthood. Experience in group dynamics in providing nutritional education to a target population.

Prerequisites: FCS 140 or FCS 242

Credits: 3

Detailed treatment of quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and statistical thermodynamics. Topics include the foundations of quantum mechanics, application of quantum mechanics to atomic and molecular structure, foundations of spectroscopic techniques, photophysics and photochemistry, statistical thermodynamics, and molecular aspects of reaction kinetics. “C” (2.0) or higher in all prerequisites.

Prerequisites: MATH 122, PHYS 212, CHEM 445

Credits: 3

An in-depth study of linear operators and their related spaces, dimension, rank, matrix representation of linear operators, special matrices, determinants, eigenvectors and eigenvalues.

Prerequisites: MATH 345 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

The development, establishment, and execution of personal, local, federal and global food issues are studied. A previous nutrition course is not required. Graduate students, with the instructor, will develop an additional project, relating the student's major interest to food policy.

Prerequisites: FCS 242 and FCS 340

Credits: 3

The pathophysiological, nutrient assessment, planning and counseling aspects of biliary, surgical, endocrine, cardiovascular and renal conditions. Case-based approach.

Prerequisites: FCS 442

Credits: 1

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 445. An advanced treatment of measurement theory and data analysis precedes a series of thermodynamic and kinetic experiments designed to complement topics treated in lecture to help students' independence and sophistication in planning, performing, and reporting experimental work. Prereq: CHEM 445 previously or concurrently

Prerequisites: CHEM 445

Credits: 1

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 446. Experiments and computational projects in quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. The experiments and projects will continue to work toward the goal of increasing the students' independence and sophistication. Prereq: C (2.0) or better in CHEM 445; pre or coreq: CHEM 446

Prerequisites: CHEM 445

Credits: 4

Lecture/laboratory course that presents an integrated view of plant biology, crop science, ecology, sustainability and current issues in biotechnology. Course focuses on issues of global concern such as sustainable food production, cropping techniques, climate change responses, pest management and herbicides, resistance, biofuels, genetically modified crops, molecular pharming, and tissue culture. Fall.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106

Credits: 3

The principle and operation of instruments and their application to biological research. Types of instrumentation examined include spectroscopic, chromatographic, electroanalytic, radiographic, and imaging. Laboratory Information Management systems (LIMS) will also be examined. Emphasis is placed on GLP, GMP, and ISO 9000 practices.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, or consent 

Credits: 4

The application of engineering principles and skills as applied to fermentation and to biological product recovery. Prereq: BIOL 270 and one semester each of calculus, physics, and organic chemistry, taken concurrently with BIOL 456.

Prerequisites: BIOL 270 and one semester each of calculus, physics, and organic chemistry, taken concurrently with BIOL 456. 

Credits: 4

Continuation of Biological Engineering Analysis I. The application of engineering principles and skills as applied to fermentation and to biological product recovery. Prereq: BIOL 453, taken concurrently with BIOL 457.

Prerequisites: BIOL 453, taken currently with BIOL 457 

Credits: 4

A mathematical approach to statistics with derivation of theoretical results and of basic techniques used in applications. Includes probability, continuous probability distributions, multivariate distributions, functions of random variables, central limit theorem and statistical inference. Same as STAT 455.

Prerequisites: MATH 223 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 4

A mathematical approach to statistics with derivation of theoretical results and of basic techniques used in applications, including sufficient statistics, additional statistical inference, theory of statistical tests, inferences about normal models and nonparametric methods. Same as STAT 456.

Prerequisites: MATH 455 / STAT 455 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

Practical laboratory experience in biotechnology through the selection and development of a research project. Students are expected to spend an average of 12 hours per week on the project. Prereq: Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 453

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 453 

Credits: 3

Continuation of Biotechnology Project/Laboratory I. Practical laboratory experience in biotechnology through the selection and development of a research project. Students are expected to spend an average of 12 hours per week on the project. Prereq: BIOL 456, taken concurrently with BIOL 454

Prerequisites: BIOL 456, taken concurrently with BIOL 454 

Credits: 3

This course applies probabilistic methods to problems encountered in actuarial science that prepares students for the Society of Actuaries Exam P/1.

Prerequisites: (MATH 354, STATS 354, MATH 455 or STAT 455) and MATH 223

Credits: 3

A lecture course covering basic principles of toxicity evaluation in living organisms, mechanisms of responses to chemicals or physical agents within an overview of practical medical, environmental and science policy implications. Presentation of comparisons of specific organ and tissue reactions to toxins in a variety of species follow these introductory concepts. Prereq: BIOL 105W, 106, and 1 year of General Chemistry

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and 1 year of General Chemistry 

Credits: 3

Detailed analysis of the structures, properties, and functions of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids; introduction to carbohydrate metabolism; theory for the purification and analysis of proteins. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 465 is recommended.

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, CHEM 324. BIOL 106 or permission “C” (2.0) or higher in all prerequisites.

Credits: 4

This course covers the theory of interest portion of Exam FM/2 of the Society of Actuaries. Topics include time value of money, measurement of interest, annuities certain, arithmetic and geometric annuities, amortization schedules and sinking fund, bonds and other securities, yield rates, and interest rate immunization.

Prerequisites: MATH 223

Credits: 4

A lecture/laboratory course that focuses on anthropogenic and natural toxicants, mathematical modeling of the dispersion of chemical and physical agents in the environment, effects on species and ecosystems with a special section on aquatic risk assessment. The laboratory includes techniques in environmental toxicity and a genuine research project.

Prerequisites: BIOL 460 

Credits: 3

Detailed analysis of the reactions involved in intermediary metabolism, translation, transcription, and replication.

Prerequisites: CHEM 460 

Credits: 1

A seminar course that involves critical evaluation of published studies in toxicology, student presentations of a selected published manuscript and requires students to write a paper on one aspect of the course's topic area that semeter. Topic areas vary each time the course is offered. Prereq: BIOL 105W, 106, and General Chemistry Alt-Fall

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and General Chemistry 

Credits: 3

A lecture/laboratory course focusing on the steps necessary to start a research project from project definition through methods testing and evaluation, and a final report that includes a project flow chart. Third year students will have senior and/or graduate mentors. Prereq: BIOL 105W, 106, and General Chemistry Alt-Fall

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and General Chemistry 

Credits: 3

A lecture/laboratory course where students perform all aspects of their own designed research topic in toxicology while critically evaluating the progress of other projects as well. Students will be expected to keep timelines or develop modified timelines as necessary. The inverted triangle approach of project design will be examined and then included in all designs.

Prerequisites: BIOL 464 

Credits: 2

A lecture/laboratory course, which presents methodology and instrumentation used to purify and analyze biomolecules. Techniques include chromatography, radioisotope techniques, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, spectrophotometry, and PCR analysis.

Prerequisites: Concurrent registration in CHEM 460 or completion of CHEM 460 with “C” or higher. CHEM 305 is highly recommended. 

Credits: 2

Students work in teams to solve biochemical research problems by analyzing data from experiments which they design.

Prerequisites: CHEM 460 and CHEM 465 

Credits: 3

A lecture course that examines mechanisms of drug action, physiological responses and adverse reactions from sensitivities or allergies through overdose. Prereq: BIOL 105W, 106, 230 and 1 year of General Chemistry

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and 1 year of General Chemistry 

Credits: 2

Students work in teams to solve biochemical research problems by analyzing data from experiments which they design.

Prerequisites: CHEM 460 and CHEM 465

Credits: 3

A lecture course that examines Minnesota State University, Mankato, as your own work place to develop reports on a selected group of chemical and physical hazards of the workplace. Evaluation methods and solutions to existing problems are developed with concise reporting skills. Prereq: BIOL 105W, 106 and 1 year of General Chemistry

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and 1 year of General Chemistry 

Credits: 3

This course will focus on the interface of cancer and medicine. Topics will provide a comprehensive overview of the hallmarks of cancers, mechanisms of tumorigenesis and metastasis, while simultaneously emphasizing drug design, mechanisms of action, and structure-activity relationships for targeting these pathways in precision medicine. Past/current treatments will be evaluated for their therapeutic benefits, side effects, and resistance mechanisms. Moreover, primary literature will serve to illustrate the concepts and how these malignancies are modeled in research for drug discovery and development.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course provides an introduction to techniques and analysis involved with solving mathematical problems using technology. Topics included are errors in computation, solutions of linear and nonlinear equations, numerical differentiation and integration, and interpolation.

Prerequisites: MATH 122, MATH 247 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 4

This course is a continuation of MATH 470. Topics included are the algebraic eigenvalue problem, least squares approximation, solutions of systems of nonlinear equations, numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations.

Prerequisites: MATH 470 and MATH 223 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 4

Role of microorganisms in soil, air, water, sewage processes as well as methods of measurement and detection. Special emphasis on the role of microorganisms in bioremediation. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and BIOL 270 

Credits: 3

Emphasizes the analyses and assessment of the effectiveness of consumer protection efforts. Emphasis will be placed on government laws, regulations, and agencies at the federal, state and local levels.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Viruses infect all living things, such as bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals (including humans). There are many viruses that cause significant human mortality and morbidity, such as influenza and smallpox viruses. However, the vast majority of viruses that infect humans have little or no negative impact on our health and well-being. This course will teach Virology by stressing the rules of replication that every virus must follow. The use of viruses as molecular tools, virus-host interactions, and current viral outbreaks will also be discussed.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and BIOL 270

Credits: 3

The system approach to analyzing family situations to make decisions and correlate resources in the resolution of family managerial problems. Emphasis on the application of managerial skills to lifestyle situations: young-families, older adults, special needs, singles, and low income.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Fundamental principles of humoral and cell mediated immunity and the application of these principles. Current experimental work in the different areas of immunology will be discussed. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and BIOL 270 

Credits: 4

Students will learn fundamental concepts of computer programming and write software to implement a variety of mathematical algorithms, manipulate large amounts of data, test conjectures, and make abstract mathematical concepts concrete. Programming concepts include input versus output, data structures, local and global variables, switch state- ments, iteration, recursion, halting conditions, modularity, debugging, and algorithm analysis. Programming projects may vary with instructor, but could include topics from enumerative combinatorics, graph theory, group theory, linear algebra, and number theory.

Prerequisites: Math 345 and Math 375 with a "C" (2.0) or better, and senior standing or consent.

Credits: 4

This course will cover bacterial, fungal, and viral human pathogens: what diseases they cause, how they cause disease, and how humans defend against and prevent those diseases. In the laboratory the student will isolate and identify pathogenic microorganisms using microbiological, biochemical, and immunological techniques.

Prerequisites: BIOL 270 

Credits: 4

Theory and practice of modern instrumental methods including basic electronics. Special emphasis placed on sampling methods, analog and digital electronics, electrochemistry, spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods, surface and thin-film analysis and computer acquisition and data processing techniques. Prereq: CHEM 305; PHYS 212 or 222 is recommended

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 305; PHYS 212 or PHYS 222 is recommended 

Credits: 5

This course presents the physiology and genetics of microorganisms emphasizing those aspects unique to bacteria and archea. Topics include: energy production; biosynthesis of small molecules and DNA, RNA, and proteins; the formation of cell walls and membranes; microbial differentiation and behavior; and the genetic and biochemical regulation of these processes. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 270 

Credits: 4

The role microbes play in production and spoilage of food products, as prepared for mass market. Topics include foodborn pathogens, epidemiology and control, essential principles in sanitation including Hazard Analysis/Critical Control Point and ISO 9000 requirements. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106 and BIOL 270 

Credits: 3

Introduce students to the how's and why's of family financial management to reduce mistakes made in successfully managing financial aspects of life. For non-business majors.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

This course will cover both eukaryotic and prokaryotic molecular biology including: DNA and RNA structure, transcription, regulation of gene expression, RNA processing, protein synthesis, DNA replication, mutagenesis and repair, recombination, and insertion elements. A number of important techniques used in recombinant DNA technology will be discussed and practiced.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 211

Credits: 4

Methods and materials for teaching physical sciences in middle school through high school. Clinical experiences are required for the course.

Prerequisites: Consent 

Credits: 3

The development of selected topics from before the Hellenistic time period to the late twentieth century. Familiarity with the content of HIST 180 is beneficial.

Prerequisites: MATH 345 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

Provides experience with a wide variety of biological laboratory exercises to prepare prospective elementary teachers. Emphasis is on building knowledge, skills, and confidence. The course will cover major biological concepts and environmental education through classroom-ready examples selected to illustrate each concept.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

In this course, students will develop discipline-specific skills in critical reading and evaluation of the primary and secondary literature, including the use of libraries and databases to identify reliable sources. Work will culminate in a literature review that synthesizes the current state of research in synthetic polymers, biological macromolecules, supramolecular aggregates and/or meso/nanoscale materials with consideration toward future directions. Throughout the course, students will participate in peer review, revision of written work, learn key ethical considerations of writing, develop better writing mechanics and understand different conventions of scientific writing all while increasing their familiarity in the topics above.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

Experience in maintaining and supervising laboratories. For individuals desiring additional experience with students in laboratory situations.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Analyze issues and concerns related to family life education. Investigate teaching strategies and methods of evaluation. Preparation of appropriate lesson plans.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-3

.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Advanced viewpoint of mathematics content and learning theories, teaching strategies, reading strategies, assessments, and planning, teaching and reflecting on grades 5-8 mathematics. Field experiences in grades 5-8 mathematics classroom required.

Prerequisites: MATH 290 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

Study of the philosophy, objectives, and implementation of adult and technical education for family consumer science professionals. Emphasis is placed on the knowledge and skills which are necessary for the process and preparation of delivering effective leader-led individual and group learning with concentration on methods, tools, and techniques employed in facilitating adult learning.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

This class provides MAX scholars with an opporutnity to explore a set of topics related to achieving success in academic, professional and personal realms. Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers and industry members as well as student participants. Students will be required to participate in mentoring of lower division MAX scholarship recipients and provide written and oral presentations of various topics during the semester.Fall, SpringPrereq: Receipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent

Prerequisites: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent.

Credits: 3

Numerical, verbal, symbolic and graphical representations of quantitative relationships, concatenations in written mathematics, problem solving, dynamic geometry, perspective drawing, parametric equations, geometric probability, transition matrices, statistics and calculus using technology.

Prerequisites: MATH 290 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

Curriculum development,implementation, and administration of family consumer science educational programs for youth of varied abilities, interests, and socioeconomic levels. 12 hour program clinical required. For FCS Education majors only; unless permission from instructor.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

A basic science methods course designed to prepare prospective junior and senior high life science teachers. Course will cover science teaching methods and support materials as they apply to life science teaching situations. Prereq: 16 credits BIOL

Prerequisites: 16 credits BIOL 

Credits: 3

Learning theories, teaching strategies, assessments and planning, teaching and reflecting on secondary (grades 9-12) school mathematics. Field experiences in grades 9-12 mathematics classroom required.

Prerequisites: MATH 290 with “C” (2.0) or better or consent

Credits: 3

A lecture/laboratory course that provides opportunity for prospective junior and senior high life science teachers to observe, practice, and refine their teaching skills. Students will work in a school setting and experience actual classroom.

Prerequisites: BIOL 485 

Credits: 17

The clinical internship and training include lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of nuclear medicine technology in affiliation with Mayo School of Health Sciences in Rochester, MN.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-3

Current issues and/or research findings to be announced as offered. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

Student will work with an experienced member of the faculty in teaching a college mathematics course.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

A systems perspective on parent-child relationship. This course covers parent-child issues during the stages of human development. It also focuses on special needs children and families, cross-cultural issues and family violence. Emphasis is on research and theory and parenting education strategies.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 17

The clinical internship and training include lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of nuclear medicine technology in affiliation with Mayo School of Health Sciences in Rochester, MN.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-3

A course of study in which a group of students study a topic by examining results through reports and discussions. May be repeated for credit on each new topic.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

Capstone course for majors in Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Chemistry Teaching. During this course, students will present their mentored undergraduate research projects OR present a literature review synthesized from primary literature articles. Forums for presentation include an oral presentation and poster presentation.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

A variable topic course designed for a selected topic in Biology. Workshops provide an intensive learning experience on a new topic in the Biological Sciences and/ or hands-on experiences in a current area not covered by other course offerings. The course involves background reading, demonstrations, and laboratory or field experiences.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-3

Workshop topics vary as announced in class schedule. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

A short course devoted to a specific mathematical topic. May be repeated for credit on each new topic.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

May be repeated on each new topic.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

A course designed to upgrade the qualifications of persons on-the-job. May be repeated for credit on each new topic.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course is designed to allow undergraduate students an opportunity to integrate their undergraduate mathematics experiences by engaging each student in working on a problem in applied or theoretical mathematics. In doing so, students will see connections between the various topics found in the undergraduate mathematics curriculum. Content will vary by semester. An important component of this course will be the preparation and presentation of a research paper describing the student's progress toward a solution of the problem under consideration. Problems will arise from the course content and materials as presented by the instructor. Because of the breadth of mathematical topics needed for successful completion of the course, students need to have senior standing.

Prerequisites: Two of the following: MATH 316, MATH 321, MATH 345, MATH 375 and senior standing (or permission of the instructor). Course can also be taken independent study with permission of a cooperating faculty member. 

Credits: 2

Preparation for advancement in a career as a registered dietitian, including first draft of the dietetic internship application,presentation of the student's portfolio and a seminar presentation on a topic of their choice. Prereq: Graduation by the following May to December, FCS 498 or concurrent

Prerequisites: Graduation by the following May to December; FCS 497 or concurrent 

Credits: 1-3

.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course is designed to allow undergraduate students an opportunity to integrate their undergraduate mathematics experiences by engaging each student in working on a problem in applied or theoretical mathematics. In doing so, students will see connections between the various topics found in the undergraduate mathematics curriculum. Content will vary by semester. An important component of this course will be the preparation and presentation of a research paper describing the student's progress toward a solution of the problem under consideration. Problems will arise from the course content and materials as presented by the instructor. Because of the breadth of mathematical topics needed for successful completion of the course, students need to have senior standing.

Prerequisites: Two of the following: MATH 316, MATH 321, MATH 345, MATH 375 and senior standing (or permission of the instructor). Course can also be taken independent study with permission of a cooperating faculty member. 

Credits: 1-12

The clinical internship and training includes lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of cytotechnology. Instructor permission required.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

This class provides MAX scholars with an opporutnity to explore a set of topics related to achieving success in academic, professional and personal realms. Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers and industry members as well as student participants. Students will be required to participate in mentoring of lower division MAX scholarship recipients and provide written and oral presentations of various topics during the semester.

Prerequisites: Recipient of a MAX scholarship or instructor consent

Credits: 1-3

A scheduled, supervised work assignment that includes preparation and delivery of family life education materials within a community/organizational/corporate setting.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-12

Continuation of Cytotechnology Clinical Internship I. The clinical internship and training includes lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of cytotechnology. Instructor Permission required.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-12

Continuation of Cytotechnology Clinical Internship II. The clinical internship and training includes lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of cytotechnology. Instructor Permission required.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

A course in an area of mathematics not regularly offered. May be repeated for credit on each new topic.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 2-3

Topics announced as offered. May be repeated.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-12

Continuation of Cytotechnology Clinical Internship III. The clinical internship and training includes lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of cytotechnology. Instructor Permission required.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-12

Experience in applied biology according to a prearranged training program for a minimum of five 40-hour weeks.

Prerequisites: Consent 

Credits: 1-6

A scheduled work assignment with supervision in private business, industry and government agency appropriate to each area of concentration.

Prerequisites: Consent 

Credits: 1-16

.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-12

Experience in applied biology according to a prearranged training program for a minimum of five 40 hour weeks. Only four credits can be applied to the major.

Prerequisites: Consent 

Credits: 1-6

This is research mentored by a faculty member in the Department. The Research mentor will work with the student to create a document outlining research goals and time commitment for each credit or registration attempt. In order for CHEM 498 credits to apply to the student's program of study as unrestricted elective credits, the student must submit a formal written report that meets ACS or ASBMB requirements at the end of their research.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-12

Provides a student the opportunity to gain expertise and experience in a special field under the supervision of a qualified person.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

Individual Study

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

Arranged with the instructor.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

Independent individual study under the guidance and direction of a faculty member in mathematics. Special arrangements must be made with an appropriate faculty member. May be repeated for credit on each new topic.

Prerequisites: none