Electrical Engineering

Undergraduate Programs

Majors

Program Locations Total Credits
Electrical Engineering BSEE BSEE - Bachelor of Electrical Engineering
  • Mankato
128

Policies & Faculty

Policies

Admission to Major. Admission to the college is necessary before enrolling in 300- and 400-level courses. Minimum college requirements are:

  • A minimum of 32 earned semester credit hours.
  • A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 (“C”).

Please contact the department for application procedures.

During the spring semester of the sophomore year, students should submit an application form for admission to the Electrical Engineering program. Admission to the program is selective and, following applications to the department, subject to approval from the department chair. The department makes a special effort to accommodate transfer students. Only students admitted to the program are permitted to enroll in upper-division electrical engineering courses. No transfer credits are allowed for upper-division engineering courses except by department chair review and approval.

Before being accepted into the program and admitted to 300-level engineering courses (typically in the fall semester), a student must complete the following courses including all necessary prerequisites:

  • General Physics I and II (calculus-based) (8 credits)
  • Calculus I, Calculus II and Differential Equations (12 credits)
  • Introduction to Electrical/Computer Engineering I and II (6 credits)
  • Circuit Analysis I and II (including lab) (7 credits)
  • English Composition (4 credits)
  • Technical Communication (4 credits)
  • Microprocessor course and lab (4 credits) 

A cumulative GPA of 2.5 for all science and math courses must have been achieved for program admittance. Grades must be 1.65 (“C-“) or better for courses to be accepted.

GPA Policy. Students graduating with a degree in Electrical Engineering must have:

completed a minimum of 20 semester credit hours of upper division EE course work;
have a cumulative GPA of 2.25 or higher in all upper division Minnesota State Mankato EE coursework;
have completed their senior design sequence at Minnesota State Mankato; and
Grades must be 1.65 (“C-”) or better for courses taken at Minnesota State Mankato to be accepted
Petition to evaluate transfer credits must occur no later than the first semester the student is enrolled at Minnesota State Mankato.

All international students wishing to have transfer credits granted from non-U.S. schools will be required to use the ECE evaluation service to be completed no later than first semester at Minnesota State Mankato.

P/N Grading Policy. A student who majors in EE must elect the grade option for all courses even if offered by another department. 

Contact Information

College of Science, Engineering and Technology Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering and Technology 242 Trafton Science Center N

(507) 389-5747
https://cset.mnsu.edu/ecet

Faculty

100 Level

Credits: 1

This course offers an introduction to the various disciplines of engineering and their relationship to the principles of physics and mathematics. Students are prepared for academic success and the transition into an engineering program.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-12

Credits: 3

This introductory course covers digital systems topics including binary numbers, logic gates, Boolean algebra, circuit simplification using Karnaugh maps, flip-flops, counters, shift registers and arithmetic circuits. Problem solving methods, study skills and professional development will be addressed throughout the course.

Prerequisites: MATH 112

Credits: 3

his course presents algorithmic approaches to problem solving and computer program design using the C language. Students will explore Boolean expressions, implement programs using control structures, modular code and file input/output, and interface with external hardware using robots and sensors.

Prerequisites: EE 106

200 Level

Credits: 3

This course is meant to develop Electrical Engineering Circuit Analysis skills in DC and AC circuits. It includes circuit laws and theorems, mesh and node analysis. Natural and step response of RL, RC, and RLC circuits.

Prerequisites: PHYS 222 or concurrent, MATH 321 or concurrent

Credits: 3

Continuation of Circuit Analysis I to include special topics in circuit analysis.

Prerequisites: EE 230 and EE 240, MATH 321, PHYS 222 

Credits: 3

A course that teaches how to write computer assembly language programs, make subroutine calls, perform I/O operations, handle interrupts and resets, interface with a wide variety of peripheral chips to meet the requirements of applications.

Prerequisites: EE 106, EE 107

Credits: 1

Use of development boards and assembly language programming to handle interrupts, interface with parallel I/O ports, memory, and timers. Experiments will involve signal and frequency measurements, data conversions, and interface design.

Prerequisites: EE 106, EE 107

Credits: 1

Laboratory support for EE 230. Use of laboratory instrumentation to measure currents and voltages associated with DC and AC circuits. Statistical analysis of measurement data. Measurements of series, parallel and series-parallel DC and AC circuits. Measurement of properties for circuits using operational amplifiers. Measurement of transient responses for R-L and R-C circuits. Simulation of DC and AC circuits using PSPICE. Concepts covered in EE 230 will be verified in the laboratory. Pre-req: Must be taken concurrently with EE 230.

Prerequisites: Must be taken concurrently with EE 230. 

Credits: 1

This is the lab associated with EE231 class giving students hands on experience of building and testing AC circuits

Prerequisites: EE, 230, EE 231, EE 240

Credits: 2

Simple coding schemes, Boolean algebra fundamentals, elements of digital building blocks such as gates, flip-flops, shift registers, memories, etc.; basic engineering aspects of computer architecture.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

Laboratory support to complement EE 244. Use of laboratory instrumentation to measure characteristics of various logic circuits and digital subsystems. Experimental evaluation of digital logic devices and circuits including logic gates, flip-flops, and sequential machines.

Prerequisites: EE 230 and concurrent with EE 244.

Credits: 1

Laboratory support for EE 231 and EE 244. Experimental evaluation of AC and transient circuits, digital logic devices including logic gates, flip flops, and sequential machines.

Prerequisites: EE 230, EE 240 and concurrently with EE 231 and EE 244

Credits: 3

Introduction to representing digital hardware using a hardware description language. Introduction to implementation technologies such as PAL's, PLA's, FPGA's and Memories. Analysis, synthesis and design of sequential machines; synchronous, pulse mode, asynchronous and incompletely specified logic.

Prerequisites: EE 106, EE 107

Credits: 1

Laboratory support for EE 282 practical aspects of design and analysis of different types of sequential machines will be presented through laboratory experience.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

Varied topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering. May be repeated as topics change. Pre-req: to be determined by course topic

Prerequisites: to be determined by course topic 

300 Level

Credits: 3

Introduction to crystal structure, energy band theory, conduction and optical phenomenon in semiconductors, metals and insulators. Study of equilibrium and non-equilibrium charge distribution, generation, injection, and recombination. Analysis and design of PN-junctions, (bipolar transistor, junction) and MOS field-effect transistors. Introduction to transferred electron devices and semiconductor diode laser.

Prerequisites: PHYS 222, and MATH 321 

Credits: 1

Laboratory support for EE 303. Experiments include resistivity and sheet resistance measurements of semiconductor material, probing material, probing of IC chips, PN-junction IV and CV measurements, BJT testing to extract its parameters, MOSFET testing and evaluating its parameters, cv-measurements of MOS structure, and familiarization with surface analysis tools.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Introduction to discrete and microelectronics circuits including analog and digital electronics. Device characteristics including diodes, BJTs, JFETs, and MOSFETs will be studied. DC bias circuits, small and large signal SPICE modeling and analysis and amplifier design and analysis will be discussed.

Prerequisites: EE 231

Credits: 3

This second course of the electronics sequence presenting concepts of feedback, oscillators, filters, amplifiers, operational amplifiers, hysteresis, bi-stability, and non-linear functional circuits. MOS and bipolar digital electronic circuits, memory, electronic noise, and power switching devices will be studied.Spring

Prerequisites: EE 332 

Credits: 3

A more advanced study of microprocessors and microcontrollers in embedded system design. Use of C language in programming, interrupt interfaces such as SPI, I2C, and CAN. External memory design and on-chip program memory protection are also studied.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

Electrical and computer engineering project and program management and evaluation techniques will be studied. Emphasis will be placed on the use of appropriate tools for planning, evaluation, and reporting on electrical and computer engineering projects.Prereq: Junior Standing and Admission into the Electrical or Computer Engineering program.

Prerequisites: Junior Standing

Credits: 1

Application of the design techniques in the engineering profession. Electrical engineering project and program management and evaluation including computer assisted tools for planning and reporting, design-to-specification techniques and economic constraints.

Prerequisites: EE 336

Credits: 3

Analysis of linear systems and signals in the time and frequency domain. Laplace and Fourier transforms. Z-transform and discrete Fourier transforms.

Prerequisites: EE 230. MATH 321 and PHYS 222

Credits: 1

This lab is designed to accompany EE 332. The lab covers the experimental measurement and evaluation of diode, BJT, and MOS characteristics; various feedback topologies; oscillator and op-amp circuits; and rectifiers and filter circuitry.

Prerequisites: EE 231 and EE 332 taken concurrently.

Credits: 1

This course will accompany EE 333 course dealing with laboratory experience of designing, evaluating and simulation of source and emitter coupled logic circuits, output stages and power amplifiers, negative feedback amplifiers, oscillator circuits, Multivibrators, Schmidt Trigger, 555 timer application to Multivibrators, Memory circuits, CMOS logic circuits, signal generating and waveform shaping circuits.

Prerequisites: EE 332, EE 333

Credits: 1

Laboratory support for EE 334. Use of development boards and C programming language to handle I/O devices, interrupts, and all peripheral functions. Multiple functions such as timers, A/D converters, I/O devices, interrupts, and serial modules will be used together to perform desired operations.

Prerequisites: Concurrent with EE 334

Credits: 3

Vector fields. Electrostatic charges, potential and fields; displacement. Steady current/current density; magnetostatic fields, flux density. Materials properties. Faraday's Law and Maxwell's equations. Skin effect. Wave propagation, plane waves, guided waves. Radiation and antennas. Transmission line theory.

Prerequisites: EE 231, MATH 223, MATH 321 and PHYS 222

Credits: 3

Signals and Systems, Fourier transforms, Parseval's theorem. Autocorrelation functions and spectral density functions. Information theory. Noise and noise figure, probability and statistics. Transformation of random variables, probability of error and bit error rate. Modulation and demodulation. Overview of analog, sampled analog and digital communication systems. Spread spectrum systems.

Prerequisites: EE 341, MATH 223

Credits: 3

Theory and principles of linear feedback control systems. Analysis of linear control systems using conventional techniques like block diagrams, Bode plots, Nyquist plots and root-locus plots. Introduction to cascade compensation: proportional, derivative and integral compensation. State space models.

Prerequisites: EE 341 

Credits: 1

Measurement techniques using the oscilloscope, spectrum analyzer and network analyzer. Signals and spectra. Frequency response. Noise and noise figure measurements. Intermodulation products. Amplitude and frequency modulation/demodulation. Sampling, aliasing, and intersymbol interference. Bit error measurement.

Prerequisites: Concurrent with EE 353

Credits: 1

Laboratory support for EE 358. Experimental evaluation of basic control system concepts including transient response and steady state performance. Analog and digital computers.

Prerequisites: EE 341 and concurrent with EE 358

Credits: 4

This course explains the interfacing method between a sensor and the microcontroller, describes the features and functions of several frequently used sensors, it then proceeds to explore the subject of sensor fusion, describe the algorithms how multiple sensors are used to extract correct and more useful information than each individual single sensor; finally the course also explores how a large number of sensor nodes are connected together via the wireless or wired networking technology using one of the few possible topologies to enable the monitoring and control of our environment to improve our life.

Prerequisites: EE334 & EE344

Credits: 3

High-level language constructs using a selected assembly language, design alternatives of computer processor datapath and control, memory hierarchy/management unit, use of HDL in describing and verifying combinational and sequential circuits. Design of computer processor and memory system.

Prerequisites: EE 234, EE 235, EE 281

Credits: 0

Curricular Practical Training: Co-Operative Experience is a zero-credit full-time practical training experience for one summer and an adjacent fall or spring term. Special rules apply to preserve full-time student status. Please contact an advisor in your program for complete information.

Prerequisites: EE 235. At least 60 credits earned; in good standing; instructor permission; co-op contract; other prerequisites may also apply.

400 Level

Credits: 3

Overview of accounting and finance and their interactions with engineering. Lectures include the development and analysis of financial statements, time value of money, decision making tools, cost of capital, depreciation, project anaysis and payback, replacement analysis, and other engineering decision making tools.

Prerequisites: Advanced standing in the program

Credits: 3

Behavior of analog systems and digital systems in the presence of noise, principles of digital data transmission, baseband digital modulation, baseband demondulation/detection, bandpass mondulation and demodulation of digital signals. Channel coding, modulation and coding trade-offs, spread spectrum techniques, probability and information theory.

Prerequisites: EE 353 and EE 363 

Credits: 3

Design of combinational and sequential systems and peripheral interfaces. Design techniques using MSI and LSI components in an algorithmic state machine; implementation will be stresses. Rigorous timing analysis transmission-line effects and metastability of digital systems will be studied.

Prerequisites: EE 244 

Credits: 1

The design and organization of engineering projects. Project proposals, reporting, feasibility studies, and interpretation. Specification preparation, interpretation, and control. Issues involving creativity, project planning and control, and intellectual property rights. Students enrolled in this course must initiate and complete a design project in a small team format.

Prerequisites: EE 337 and senior standing 

Credits: 3

The features, data rate, frequency range, and operation of several wireless networking protocols such as Wi-Fi, Low Energy Bluetooth, Near Field Communication, Radio frequency Identifier (RFID), Threads, and ZigBee that can be used to implement Internet of Things (IoT) are introduced. The electrical, functional, and procedural specifications of Wi-Fi are then examined in detail. The programming and data transfer using the hardware Wi-Fi kit are carried out to demonstrate the versatility of this protocol.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course is a continuation of EE 358. Techniques for the analysis of continuous and discrete systems are developed. These techniques include pole placement, state estimation, and optimal control.

Prerequisites: EE 358 and EE 368 

Credits: 3

Develop design and analysis techniques for discrete signals and systems via Z-transforms, Discrete Fourier Transforms, implementation of FIR and IIR filters. The various concepts will be introduced by the use of general and special purpose hardware and software for digital signal processing.

Prerequisites: EE 341 

Credits: 3

Power generation, transmission and consumption concepts, electrical grid modeling, transmission line modeling, electric network power flow and stability, fault tolerance and fault recovery, economic dispatch, synchronous machines, renewable energy sources and grid interfacing.

Prerequisites: EE 231 or via permission from instructor

Credits: 4

This course is designed to provide students with knowledge of the design and analysis of static power conversion and control systems. The course will cover the electrical characteristics and properties of power semiconductor switching devices, converter power circuit topologies, and the control techniques used in the applications of power electronic systems. Laboratories consist of computer-based modeling and simulation exercises, as well as hands-on laboratory experiments on basic converter circuits and control schemes.

Prerequisites: EE 333

Credits: 3

Introduction to theory and techniques of integrated circuit fabrication processes, oxidation, photolithography, etching, diffusion of impurities, ion implantation, epitaxy, metallization, material characterization techniques, and VLSI process integration, their design and simulation by SUPREM.

Prerequisites: EE 303 and EE 332

Credits: 3

Principles of electromagnetic radiation, antenna parameters, dipoles, antenna arrays, long wire antennas, microwave antennas, mechanisms of radiowave propagation, scattering by rain, sea water propagation, guided wave propagation, periodic structures, transmission lines, microwave/millimeter wave amplifiers and oscillators, MIC & MMIC technology.

Prerequisites: EE 350 

Credits: 1

Completion of design projects and reports. Lectures on ethics, issues in contracting and liability, concurrent engineering, ergonomics and environmental issues, economics and manufacturability, reliability and product lifetimes. Lectures by faculty and practicing engineers.

Prerequisites: EE 467 and Senior Standing

Credits: 3

Magnetic and superconducting properties of materials, microscopic theory of superconductivity and tunneling phenomenon. Josephson and SQUID devices, survey of computer memories, memory cell and shift register, A/D converters and microwave amplifiers. Integrated circuit technology and high temperature superconductors.

Prerequisites: EE 303 

Credits: 1

Introduction to integrated circuit fabrication processes, device layout, mask design, and experiments related to wafer cleaning, etching, thermal oxidation, thermal diffusion, photolithography, and metallization. Fabrication of basic integrated circuit elements pn junction, resistors, MOS capacitors, BJT and MOSFET in integrated form. Use of analytic tools for in process characterization and simulation of the fabrication process by SUPREM.

Prerequisites: Concurrent with EE 475

Credits: 1

This laboratory accompanies EE 484. The laboratory covers the basics of layout rules, chip floor planning, the structure of standard cells and hierarchical design, parasitic elements, routing, and loading. Students will learn to design and layout standard cells as well as how to use these cells to produce complex circuits. The laboratory culminates with the individual design and layout of a circuit.

Prerequisites: Concurrent with EE 484

Credits: 3

Electrical power and magnetic circuit concepts, switch-mode converters, mechanical electromechanical energy conversion, DC motor drives, feedback controllers, AC machines and space vectors, permanent magnet AC machines and drives, induction motors and speed control of induction motors, stepper motors.

Prerequisites: EE 230 

Credits: 3

his course covers cutting-edge areas of the study in smart grid and power systems. This course will cover fundamentals of power flow calculation, wind power and its integration, solar power and its integration, distributed generation sources, energy storage devices and electric vehicles. The basic ideas of the integration of microgrid with distribution networks, the demand response and demand side management, and electricity market will be introduced. Moderate work of programming in professional power systems software tools, PowerWorld and PSCAD will be required.

Prerequisites: EE333

Credits: 3

The basics of digital VLSI technology. Bipolar and MOS modeling for digital circuits. Physical transistor layout structure and IC process flow and design rules. Custom CMOS/BICMOS static and dynamic logic styles, design and analysis. Clock generation, acquisition, and synchronization procedures. Special purpose digital structures including memory, Schmitt triggers, and oscillators. Individual design projects assigned.

Prerequisites: EE 333 

Credits: 4

This course focuses on CMOS Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) design of Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) systems. The student will gain an understanding of issues and tools related to ASIC design and implementation. The coverage will include ASIC physical design flow, including logic synthesis, timing, floor-planning, placement, clock tree synthesis, routing and verification. An emphasis will be placed on low power optimization. The focus in this course will be Register-transfer level (RTL) abstraction using industry-standard VHDL/Verilog tools.

Prerequisites: EE 484

Credits: 3

Overview of wireless communication and control systems. Characterization and measurements of two-port RF/IF networks. Transmission lines. Smith chart. Scattering parameters. Antenna-preselector-preamplifier interface. Radio wave propagation. Fading. RF transistor amplifiers, oscillators, and mixer/modulator circuits. Multiple access techniques. Transmitter/receiver design considerations. SAW matched filters.

Prerequisites: EE 353 and EE 363 

Credits: 4

This course introduces students the recent advances in real-time embedded systems design. Topics cover real-time scheduling approaches such as clock-driven scheduling and static and dynamic priority driven scheduling, resource handling, timing analysis, inter-task communication and synchronization, real-time operating systems (RTOS), hard and soft real-time systems, distributed real-time systems, concepts and software tools involved in the modeling, design, analysis and verification of real-time systems.

Prerequisites: EE 107, EE 334, EE 395

Credits: 1-4

Variable

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

This class provides students pursuing a minor in Global Solutions in Engineering and Technology with an opportunity to explore a set of topics related to achieving success in advance of and following an international experience (internship, study abroad, etc.). Speakers will include faculty, graduate students, visiting researchers and industry members as well as student participants. Returning students will be required to participate in mentoring of students preparing for their international experience and provide written and/or oral presentations of various topics during the semester. This course is required both before and after participation in the international experience (min. 2 cr.)

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

Variable

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-4

Varied topics in Electrical and Computer Engineering. May be repeated as topics change.

Prerequisites: to be determined by course topic

Credits: 1-6

Variable

Prerequisites: none