Criminal Justice

Undergraduate Programs

Majors

Program Locations Total Credits
Criminal Justice BS BS - Bachelor of Science
  • Mankato
120

Policies & Faculty

Policies

Contact Information

109 Morris Hall

Office (507) 389-2721

Faculty

100 Level

Credits: 3

Examines the making of criminal law, the evolution of policing, the adjudication of persons accused of criminal law violations, and the punishment of adult offenders.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-09

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 3

The course provides a survey of the institutions and processes of the criminal justice system with an emphasis on the role of law enforcement agencies in a free society. Political theories of justice are explored with theories of crime causation.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

Credits: 3

An overview of conflicting theories in criminal justice and the tools to critically evaluate the theories and present the strengths and weaknesses of each in written, oral or other forms.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

Credits: 3

This course explores the history of community policing and explains what community policing is and is not. It also examines what research has discovered about the relationship of the police with the community. The student will be introduced to the value of positive interactions between the police officer and the citizens they serve, as well as ways to incorporate problem-solving strategies on both small and large scales.

Prerequisites: none

200 Level

Credits: 3

Introduction to academic concepts and issues in corrections, with emphasis on student professional development. The course includes a 50-hour service learning component to be completed outside of class. Correction majors should take this course as early as possible.

Prerequisites: CORR 106 and SOC 101 

Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to the numerous agencies and organizations that make up the criminal justice system and its components. A primary goal for this course is to help students prepare for, as well as succeed in, a criminal justice system career.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

The history and development of criminal law procedures and their application by law enforcement.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

The history, legal aspects of investigation, the evolution of investigations and forensics, procedures of crime investigations, procurement and preservation of evidence and interviewing.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

An extensive study of Chapter 609, Minnesota Criminal Code, and traffic law. Prereq: LAWE 231, admission to Option I or consent

Prerequisites: Admission to Option I, LAWE 231

Credits: 3

This course will expose students to theoretical foundations of human behavior and explore specific law enforcement situations in which that information can be used.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the law enforcement approach to the juvenile justice system and how it has evolved in the United States. Theories of delinquency are reviewed. Minnesota Juvenile Code in emphasized.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the law enforcement approach to the juvenile justice system and how it has evolved in the United States. Theories of delinquency are reviewed. Minnesota Juvenile Code in emphasized.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

A critical consideration of definitions of juvenile delinquency, emphasis on micro and macro level of struggle in which delinquent behavior takes place, critique of current theories on delinquency, and the juvenile justice response to delinquency.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05, GE-09

Credits: 4

May be used to explore areas of interest not covered in regular courses. A maximum of three hours applicable toward a major or minor in the department with consent of an advisor.

Prerequisites: Consent 

300 Level

Credits: 3

Research methodologies as they apply to correctional evidence-based practices are covered, as are strengths and limitations of various research practices, especially with respect to central correctional concepts such as risk, recidivism, and program evaluation. Students will gain experience with data sources, data collection, and basic interpretation of data analysis.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course is designed to provide law enforcement students with the basic information, tools, and skills needed to improve interpersonal communications with coworkers and citizens from all ethnic and cultural groups. It is also intended to provide some historical information so students can contextualize and better understand why particular groups may distrust and resist law enforcement and the criminal justice system as a whole.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to develop in the student an insight into the dynamics of interpersonal violence, particularly sexual violence. The focus will be on developing effective law enforcement responses to the victims/survivors and the perpetrators.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course utilizes a broad multi-disciplinary approach in examining the forces, theories, and popular beliefs that influenced the restriction and eventual acceptance of women in the policing profession. Included in this course are perspectives from the social, historical, biological, political, and social-psychological sciences.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course will cover the sources of intrapersonal and interpersonal stress in the law enforcement profession. Students will be required to assess their vulnerability to these stressors and develop their own strategies and tactics for coping.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Criminal forensics will include the history and development of the crime lab. Contemporary and historical cases will be discussed to provide the background and application of forensics. Also, discussion of crime lab examination of physical evidence and utilization of medico-legal specialists in investigations will be included in the course.Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

A survey of methods and techniques for the investigation of major crimes.

Prerequisites: LAWE 233 

Credits: 3

This course will cover the basic techniques of writing reports, memoranda, forms, and other documents used in the law enforcement profession. This is a writing-intensive course that will not only fulfill MN POST Report Writing requirements, but will also require students to compose numerous documents and respond to writing feedback throughout the semester.

Prerequisites: LAWE 236

Credits: 3

he course focuses on the psychological aspects of law enforcement from the perspectives of communication, interpersonal relations, and officer safety. The course will have required accompanying readings and the materials which, along with the classroom interaction, should provide the student with a solid foundation to build effective communications and to start to prepare the student psychologically for a career as a law enforcement officer. This course also has a writing intensive requirement that involves drafting, editing, and reviewing written assignments.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

The course focuses on the psychological aspects of law enforcement from the perspectives of communication, interpersonal relations, and officer safety. The course will have required accompanying readings and the materials which, along with the classroom interaction, should provide the student with a solid foundation to build effective communications and to start to prepare the student psychologically for a career as a law enforcement officer.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

The course will examine the most commonly abused and trafficked controlled substances, as well as the Minnesota criminal statutes which provide the basis for law enforcement action. Also, the major case precedents that guide law enforcement interdiction efforts are discussed. Finally, this course additionally explores narcotics investigation on multiple levels, but emphasizes local law enforcement strategies and tactics.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

JOLT is a collaborative effort between the University and several probation offices. Students will mentor delinquents in the community and be mentored by local probation officers. This is a year-long commitment.

Prerequisites: CORR 200

Credits: 3

JOLT-II is a second semester continuation of CORR 350. Can only enroll after completing CORR 350.

Prerequisites: CORR 350

Credits: 1-4

An examination of issues facing law enforcement today in constantly changing legal, social and cultural environments. Topics will vary and may be repeated for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 0

Curricular Practical Training: Co-Operative Experience is a zero-credit full-time practical training experience for one semester and an adjacent fall or spring term. Special rules apply to preserve full-time student status. Please contact an advisor in your program for complete information.

Prerequisites: At least 60 credits earned; in good standing; instructor permission; co-op contract; other prerequisites may also apply.

400 Level

Credits: 3

Implications of Sociological Knowledge for the administration of Human Services programs. Theoretical and practical aspects of administration with the Social Service systems.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 

Credits: 3

The course will examine ethics and leadership theory, interpretation, and application. Concepts such as vision, ownership, integrity, accountability, attitude, teamwork capability, monitoring, evaluation, and decision making will be interpreted through case studies of ethics and leadership in law enforcement.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Provides students with specific procedures for handling various types of routine calls and situations and provides a base for handling those incidents which are not routine. Emphasizes critical thinking skills through discussion, assignments and evaluations. Prereq: Junior or senior standing

Prerequisites: Admission to Option I 

Credits: 3

This is the capstone course for LAWE Option 1 and will include such topics as P.O.S.T. License review, ethics and interviewing skills.

Prerequisites: Admission to Option I

Credits: 3

A comparison of criminal justice philosophies, structures, and procedures found in various countries around the world. Same as POL 449.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Review of selected United States Supreme Court decisions interpreting important freedoms contained in the Bill of Rights and the 14th Amendment. Focus is on the rationale which underlies decisions and its impact on American political social processes. Provides an opportunity to exercise and develop individual analytical abilities through analysis of Court's reasoning. Same as POL 454.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

An examination of the structure, jurisdiction and processes of federal and state courts. Emphasis is placed on selection of judges and justices and on the dynamics of judicial decision-making. Same as POL 475.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

History, philosophy, techniques and countermeasures to terroristic and law intensity threats to public order. Both domestic and international terror. The blurring of the lines between low intensity conflict/terrorism and multinational high intensity crime. Same as POL 425.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

An examination of emerging administrative and management concepts and the processes related to their implementation.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This course explores the history, development and current role of federal law enforcement in the United States. This course also explores the history, implementation, and role of Homeland Security, along with the integration of purpose, action, and enforcement between Homeland Security, federal law enforcement, and local law enforcement with a lens of legal, policy, and cooperation strategies at the federal, state, and local levels.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Sociological perspective on social deviance; overview of theoretical approaches; emphasis on symbolic interactionism; issues of social control; research examples and policy implications.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 

Credits: 3

A critical consideration of myths concerning crime, perspectives on crime and their assumptions, current criminology theory, and construction of alternative explanations related to crime.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 

Credits: 3

This course complements the learning experience of traveling on a faculty led study abroad trip. The focus will be a comparison of terrorism, political violence, and counter-terrorism activities in the United States to the same activities in the visited countries based on readings, research, observation, and participation. Instructor permission is required to register for this course.

Prerequisites: Must be accepted into a faculty led study abroad trip. 

Credits: 3

Addresses the justifications and the historical development of punishment, the legal and policy issues concerning capital punishment, and the use of incarceration as a response to crime.

Prerequisites: CORR 106 and CORR 200 

Credits: 3

This course complements the learning experience of traveling on a faculty led study abroad trip. The focus will be on a comparison of international justice systems in a variety of countries based on readings, research, observation, and participation. Instructor permission is required to register for this course.

Prerequisites: Must be registered and approved for a faculty-led study abroad program.

Credits: 3

This course focuses on the experiences of women in the criminal justice system--as victims, offenders, and professionals. Women's involvement in this system (whether they were a defendant, an attorney, an inmate, a correctional officer or a crime victim) has often been overlooked or devalued. The goal of this course is to bring the special needs and contributions of women in the criminal justice system into sharper focus.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 3

Addresses theoretical roots, historical developments, and current practices of probation, parole, and other community corrections programs. Special attention is given to innovative, future approaches to community corrections. Writing intensive

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and CORR 106 

Credits: 3

Addresses theoretical roots, historical developments, and current practices of probation, parole, and other community corrections programs. Special attention is given to innovative, future approaches to community corrections.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and CORR 106 

Credits: 3

Examines the rights of inmates, probationers, and parolees.

Prerequisites: CORR 106 and CORR 200 

Credits: 3

Principles and methods of individual and group counseling with juvenile and adult offenders; development of interpersonal helping skills, negotiation, and mediation skills.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

This class will be taught in modules where students will gain learn how to determine if practices in Corrections are evidence based, the types of programming in Corrections that are supported by research, and skills and knowledge necessary to implement these practices.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

Overview of characteristics of victims, victim offender relationships, societal victimization, victim's rights and services, and restorative justice.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and CORR 106 

Credits: 3

Review of selected U.S. Supreme Court decisions relating to the powers of the President, Congress and the Judiciary, as well as the division of power between the states and the federal government. Focus is on case briefing, underlying rationales, and the development of individual analytical abilities.

Prerequisites: LAWE 231

Credits: 4

Legal procedures by which state and federal administrative agencies exercise legislative, judicial and executive powers. Emphasis is placed on the constitutional position of administrative agencies, the rule making process, the power of agencies to decide rights and obligations concerning individual cases, and judicial control of administrative action.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

A critical examination of current issues in the correctional field.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

<p>Assist the students in starting a healthy conversation on cultural competencies for correctional professionals, and develop resources, skills, and strategies needed to address racism and inequity. The idea is to take a journey in building a more inclusive, connected, and effective correctional organization. Students will discover a framework to help discuss issues related to cultural competency: learn about methods, practices, and values that define cultural competency and culturally based work in various fields and organizations; understand the complexities within ethnic communities; and gain insights into the nature of institutionalized racism.</p>

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 3

A comprehensive historical and cross-cultural study of social policy analysis, the transforming role correctional policy formation plays in correctional practice, and the process of policy change and the mechanisms leaders can employ to encourage effective and ethical social policy.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 3

A sociological perspective to examine the history of drug use and abuse in the United States. Multicultural issues in drug abuse, international drug distribution networks, prevention efforts, and legal issues will be discussed.

Prerequisites: none

Diverse Cultures: Purple

Credits: 2-6

Topics vary as announced in class schedule. May be retaken for credit if topic varies.

Prerequisites: SOC 101 

Credits: 1-5

This course explores topics in law enforcement beyond what is covered in the existing curriculum. Students study specialized topics of current importance in the field. Specific topics will change depending on the term and instructor. May be retaken with a change of topic.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

Topics vary as arranged by students and instructor. May be retaken for credit.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-8

Field placement with a law enforcement agency or related organization. Provides a learning experience in which the student can integrate and apply knowledge and theory derived from curriculum. P/N only.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

For Honors students only.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-3

Advanced study and research on topics not currently available in existing courses. May be repeated with a change of topic. Requires advisor and instructor approval of topic.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 10

Full time experience in a corrections agency with an emphasis on the development of skills. For Corrections majors only. Required for major. Formal application required.

Prerequisites: Consent 

Credits: 2

Capstone is an evaluative course which allows students to document their learning and provide an assessment of their personal learning and the effectiveness of the Corrections Program. To be taken concurrently with CORR 496. Prereq: Completion of all other required CORR courses.

Prerequisites: Completion of all other required CORR courses. 

Credits: 1-12

The internship in Corrections is designed to provide opportunities to apply classroom learning, to practice and enhance skills, to experience professional socialization, and to explore a career. It also serves as a vehicle for the student to become more aware of personal strengths and to identify areas in which further growth is needed.

Prerequisites: Consent 

Credits: 1-6

A maximum of six credits is applicable toward a single major in the department; three credits toward a minor.

Prerequisites: Consent