Biochemistry

Undergraduate Programs

Majors

Program Locations Total Credits
Biochemistry BA BA - Bachelor of Arts
  • Mankato
120
Biochemistry BS BS - Bachelor of Science
  • Mankato
120

Policies & Faculty

Policies

First year of coursework for biochemistry majors should include two semesters of chemistry (CHEM 201, CHEM 202), MATH and at least one semester of Biology (BIOL 105).  Organic Chemistry should be taken during the second year.

Admission to Major. No formal Admission to Major paperwork is required for Biochemistry.  A student can enroll in 300-and 400-level courses after they have declared biochemistry as a first major and successfully completed any pre-requisite paperwork. Students should also have an assigned advisor in the department with whom they have discussed their program.

GPA Policy. Students obtaining a major in biochemistry must maintain an overall GPA of 2.2 in all courses required for their selected program with no more than 4 credits of “D” (1.0) work in chemistry or biochemistry courses.

Residency Requirement: Students must meet a residency requirement. This means that all students who wish to receive either the Biochemistry BA or the Biochemistry BS from Minnesota State Mankato must complete the biochemistry sequence which consists of CHEM 460, CHEM 461, CHEM 465 and CHEM 466 at Minnesota State Mankato. It is important that this sequence be taken during the third (junior) year for all majors.

Students who use CHEM 498 as elective credits towards their Biochemistry degree must submit a research report to their faculty mentor upon completion of CHEM 498.

P/N Grading Policy. Courses leading to a major or minor in chemistry or biochemistry may not be taken on a P/N basis, except where P/N grading is mandatory.

Contact Information

241 Ford Hall

(507) 389-5917
http://cset.mnsu.edu/chemgeol/

Faculty

100 Level

Credits: 4

This lecture and laboratory course investigates the world of chemistry, the nature of matter and our interactions with chemicals on a daily basis. This course is intended for non-science majors and is not a preparation for CHEM 111 or CHEM 201. Credit will not be given to students who have previously taken a chemistry course at or above Chem 111 and received a passing grade.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to general chemistry. It is a non-laboratory class designed to prepare students for CHEM 201 or to be utilized as a general education course. This course will address more mathematical relationships than CHEM 106. Credit will not be given to students who have previously taken a chemistry course at or above Chem 111 and received a passing grade.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

This course covers fundamental concepts required to understand the general chemistry in living organisms. This is a non-laboratory class. This chemistry course will not prepare students for any Chemistry course at or above the 200 level.

Prerequisites: Student must demonstrate math placement requirements at or above MATH 112 in the placement chart. See Mathematics for details.

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 5

This course is an introduction to organic chemistry and biological chemistry. The laboratory will reinforce lecture.

Prerequisites: CHEM 106 or high school chemistry 

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-03

Credits: 3

This chemistry course explores the scientific methods used in criminal investigations. Course topics will include discussions of different kinds of evidence, how to select and analyze samples, and especially how to interpret results of scientific tests. Specific topics will include the analysis of DNA, drugs, accelerants and explosives, and other organic and inorganic compounds. Case studies will be used as examples throughout the course. There will also be discussions concerning the ethics of analysis and uses of forensic data.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03, GE-09

Credits: 3

This course will explore the scientific, pharmacological, neurochemical and cultural aspects of psychoactive substances. The material is presented intuitively, with no mathematics. Course topics will include discussions of the major classes of pharmaceutical and psychoactive substances, basic neurochemistry, the role of psychoactive substances in medicine, the ritual use of psychoactive substances by traditional cultures, the FDA approval process, the significance and implications of drug testing, the controversy of drug-induced behavioral modification, national and global perspectives of substance abuse and the ethics of legalization. V

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 3

An online course introducing the science related to sports issues including nutrition, movement, equipment selection, and healthy exercising/training.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Credits: 1

This course is designed for those students who struggle with Chem 191. Students will learn study skills and time management skills that will aid in their success in Chem 191. Students will also refresh concepts that were learned in high school or previous college chemistry courses.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-03

Credits: 3

From an engineering perspective, concepts of general chemistry will be investigated. Topics include atomic structure, stiochiometry, gas laws, periodic trends chemical bonds, thermodynamics, kinetics and organic chemistry.

Prerequisites: High school chemistry or “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 104. Student must demonstrate math placement requirements at or above MATH 115 in the placement chart. See Mathematics for details.

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-03

200 Level

Credits: 1

General chemistry lab for students who successfully have completed a general chemistry lecture course elsewhere and transferred to MSU. The transfer course must be accepted by the Chemistry Department as content/level appropriate and the MSU major must require Chemistry 201. This course requires special permission. Prerequisite: college level general chemistry lecture.

Prerequisites: CHEM 191

Credits: 5

Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics and states of matter. Laboratory will reinforce lecture concepts. Prereq: C or higher in MATH 112 or the equivalent; high school chemistry or C or higher in CHEM 104

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in MATH 112 or the equivalent; high school chemistry or “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 104.

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-03

Credits: 5

Continuation of the basic principles of chemistry including properties of solutions, kinetics, acids and bases, equilibria, buffers, precipitation reactions, electron transfer reactions, electrochemistry, entropy and free energy. Laboratory will reinforce lecture concepts.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 201 

Credits: 1

The course will cover aspects of the ethical conduct of research, chemical safety, and preparation for a profession related to chemistry or biochemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM 322

Credits: 1-6

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Prerequisites: none

300 Level

Credits: 4

Introduction to the principles of chemical analysis, with emphasis on classical methods of analysis. Lectures will stress the theory of chemical measurements and sample handling. Laboratory exercises will provide students with opportunities to explore calibration methods, method development, and established procedures for volumetric and gravimetric analyses. Basic atomic spectroscopy is also presented.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 202 

Credits: 3

This course is designed to survey descriptive main group chemistry and augment General Chemistry's introduction to solid state and nuclear chemistry.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 202 

Credits: 3

This course is designed to address transition metal chemistry, introduce bonding theory, nomenclature, reactivity and mechanisms for transition metal compounds. It will also address and use examples from bioinorganic chemistry and catalysis.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 202 

Credits: 4

Introduction to organic nomenclature, structure, bonding, chemical reactivity, organic acid-base reactions, mechanisms and stereochemistry. IR, MS, and NMR spectroscopy will be introduced. The chemistry of alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, alkynes, and alcohols will be covered. Laboratory illustrates synthetic techniques and the preparation and reactions of functional groups discussed during lecture.

Prerequisites: CHEM 202, “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 202.

Credits: 1

This course is a supplement to Chem 322 and includes a brief coverage of functional groups and their chemistry not previously covered that are important in biochemistry. This course is intended only for students taking, or who have taken, only one semester of organic chemistry and who plan to take Chem 360, Principles of Biochemistry.

Prerequisites: CHEM 322

Credits: 3

This course is a continuation Chem 322 and includes organic nomenclature, structure, bonding, chemical reactivity, organic acid-base reactions, and reaction mechanisms; the chemistry of ethers, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds, polyenes, ketones, aldehydes, amines, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and alpha carbonyl compounds and synthetic transformations is covered.

Prerequisites: CHEM 322 with a "C" (2.0) or higher.

Credits: 1

Laboratory will highlight common techniques including recrystallization, melting point determination, simple and fractional distillation, extraction, gas and thin layer chromatography, and chemical and spectroscopic qualitative analysis. Single and multi-step syntheses illustrating aromatic and carbonyl chemistry will be performed.

Prerequisites: CHEM 324

Credits: 4

Analysis of the structure and metabolism of biologically important compounds. This intermediate-level course is designed for students in the medical technology, food science, chemistry education, chemistry and pre-professional health majors. The laboratory teaches basic biochemical techniques.

Prerequisites: Either CHEM 322 and CHEM 324 or CHEM 322 and CHEM 323. “C” (2.0) or higher in all prerequisites 

400 Level

Credits: 3

The sources of various elements and chemical reactions between them in the atmosphere and hydrosphere are treated. Current research topics relevant to the field of environmental chemistry will also be addressed. Laboratory excercises will emphasize proper sampling technique and various analytical methods for quantifying environmentally important components.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 305 

Credits: 2

This course is designed to emphasize the theoretical foundations of physical inorganic chemistry. Course topics include: bonding theory, quantum mechanics and periodic trends, symmetry and group theory.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 322, MATH 121 

Credits: 4

Spectroscopic techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and mass spectrometry for determining structural features of molecules will be covered. Spectroscopic methods emphasize interpretation of spectra, and also provide hands-on operation of the corresponding electronic instruments. The laboratory uses these techniques for the determination of the structures of a series of unknown compounds.

Prerequisites: CHEM 324, CHEM 325. “C” (2.0) or higher in all prerequisites 

Credits: 3

Advanced synthetic organic reactions and their mechanisms. Laboratory will include examples of some of this chemistry, and techniques for reaction monitoring and product purification.

Prerequisites: CHEM 324. “C” (2.0) or higher

Credits: 2

The synthesis and properties of organic macromolecules, especially industrially important polymers, and the chemistry of other industrially important chemical reactions and processes.

Prerequisites: CHEM 324. “C” (2.0) or higher 

Credits: 4

Detailed treatment of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. Topics include equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, phase and reaction equilibrium, reaction kinetics, and thermodynamic properties of polymers, solutions, and of biochemical and electrochemical processes. Prerequisite: Chem 305, Math 121, Physics 211. ¿C¿ (2.0) or higher in all prerequisites.

Prerequisites: MATH 121, PHYS 211, CHEM 305

Credits: 3

Detailed treatment of quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and statistical thermodynamics. Topics include the foundations of quantum mechanics, application of quantum mechanics to atomic and molecular structure, foundations of spectroscopic techniques, photophysics and photochemistry, statistical thermodynamics, and molecular aspects of reaction kinetics. “C” (2.0) or higher in all prerequisites.

Prerequisites: MATH 122, PHYS 212, CHEM 445

Credits: 1

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 445. An advanced treatment of measurement theory and data analysis precedes a series of thermodynamic and kinetic experiments designed to complement topics treated in lecture to help students' independence and sophistication in planning, performing, and reporting experimental work. Prereq: CHEM 445 previously or concurrently

Prerequisites: CHEM 445

Credits: 1

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 446. Experiments and computational projects in quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. The experiments and projects will continue to work toward the goal of increasing the students' independence and sophistication. Prereq: C (2.0) or better in CHEM 445; pre or coreq: CHEM 446

Prerequisites: CHEM 445

Credits: 3

Detailed analysis of the structures, properties, and functions of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids; introduction to carbohydrate metabolism; theory for the purification and analysis of proteins. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 465 is recommended.

Prerequisites: BIOL 106, CHEM 324. BIOL 106 or permission “C” (2.0) or higher in all prerequisites.

Credits: 3

Detailed analysis of the reactions involved in intermediary metabolism, translation, transcription, and replication.

Prerequisites: CHEM 460 

Credits: 2

A lecture/laboratory course, which presents methodology and instrumentation used to purify and analyze biomolecules. Techniques include chromatography, radioisotope techniques, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, spectrophotometry, and PCR analysis.

Prerequisites: Concurrent registration in CHEM 460 or completion of CHEM 460 with “C” or higher. CHEM 305 is highly recommended. 

Credits: 2

Students work in teams to solve biochemical research problems by analyzing data from experiments which they design.

Prerequisites: CHEM 460 and CHEM 465 

Credits: 2

Students work in teams to solve biochemical research problems by analyzing data from experiments which they design.

Prerequisites: CHEM 460 and CHEM 465

Credits: 3

This course will focus on the interface of cancer and medicine. Topics will provide a comprehensive overview of the hallmarks of cancers, mechanisms of tumorigenesis and metastasis, while simultaneously emphasizing drug design, mechanisms of action, and structure-activity relationships for targeting these pathways in precision medicine. Past/current treatments will be evaluated for their therapeutic benefits, side effects, and resistance mechanisms. Moreover, primary literature will serve to illustrate the concepts and how these malignancies are modeled in research for drug discovery and development.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 4

Theory and practice of modern instrumental methods including basic electronics. Special emphasis placed on sampling methods, analog and digital electronics, electrochemistry, spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods, surface and thin-film analysis and computer acquisition and data processing techniques. Prereq: CHEM 305; PHYS 212 or 222 is recommended

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 305; PHYS 212 or PHYS 222 is recommended 

Credits: 4

Methods and materials for teaching physical sciences in middle school through high school. Clinical experiences are required for the course.

Prerequisites: Consent 

Credits: 3

In this course, students will develop discipline-specific skills in critical reading and evaluation of the primary and secondary literature, including the use of libraries and databases to identify reliable sources. Work will culminate in a literature review that synthesizes the current state of research in synthetic polymers, biological macromolecules, supramolecular aggregates and/or meso/nanoscale materials with consideration toward future directions. Throughout the course, students will participate in peer review, revision of written work, learn key ethical considerations of writing, develop better writing mechanics and understand different conventions of scientific writing all while increasing their familiarity in the topics above.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-3

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Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1

Capstone course for majors in Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Chemistry Teaching. During this course, students will present their mentored undergraduate research projects OR present a literature review synthesized from primary literature articles. Forums for presentation include an oral presentation and poster presentation.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

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Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

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Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-16

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Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

This is research mentored by a faculty member in the Department. The Research mentor will work with the student to create a document outlining research goals and time commitment for each credit or registration attempt. In order for CHEM 498 credits to apply to the student's program of study as unrestricted elective credits, the student must submit a formal written report that meets ACS or ASBMB requirements at the end of their research.

Prerequisites: none

Credits: 1-6

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Prerequisites: none